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LEE Goff 

Editor-in-Chief 

HENRY SMITH, JR, 

Business Manager 









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933 




A YEAR BOOK 

PUBLISHED BY 
THE STUDENTS 



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BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



Jy e a L c a t 




cation 

s&^2> ^Co that 
spirit of progress and 
achievement which 
has been the guiding 
influence of our fllma 
Mater, even in spirit 
of economical difficul- 
ties, we affectionately 
and respectfully dedi- 
cate this, the nine- 
teenth volume 
of the 

ENTRE NOUS 



t 









o r e w o r 



/&=**& Go cherish the 
things that are essentially 
a part of our fllma Mater, 
to add one more page 
to that checkered career 
known as life, to enrich 
and preserve the exper- 
iences of youth, has been 
the aim of this publication. 
If in some small measure 
the present happy days, 
youthful friendships and 
associations of college life 
are preserved, then our 
task will not have been 



i 



in vain. 



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The College 



Classes 



Athletics 



♦ ♦ 



Oro 



ranizations 



Features 



GjctLvLtLes c 
the year 




\^s is all a Ctkequer-boa.ro 

of CNjuahts ana JJays 
()Ykere JJesllny with. Jrlen 

for Pieces plays: 
\jtltlter ana tkilner moves, 

and males, and slays, 
G\no one by one back in Ins 

C/losel lays. 

— Rubdiyat of Omar Khayyam. 




*MP££ 



Around the 



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CAMPUS 



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PRESIDENT THOMAS V. NEAL 



LET US 



Having been at Howard only one year, accepting the duties of President June, 
1932, Dr. Neal has made wonderful progress. He started work on a ten-year plan 
for reconstruction of Howard, and already has made many improvements. Con- 
struction has begun on the amphitheatre and the Science Hall remodeled and brick 
veneered. Dr. Neal came to our College when we were already in the throes of the 
financial depression. A man of ordinary strength could not possibly have made the 
record Dr. Neal has made and the record he promises to make. Where other col- 
leges have stopped construction, Howard promises more, and where other college en- 
rollments have been reduced, ours has increased. Dr. Neal has made it possible for 
students without ready money to attend school by accepting produce and labor for 
tuition. Not only students have worked for their tuition, but unemployed parents 
have been put to work on Howard constructions, thereby enabling them to send their 
boys and girls to college. It is his plan to make Howard grow in every possible 
way, and this can be done only through increasing the enrollment, new buildings, and 
endowment fund. This is his ten-year plan, This plan will have been fulfilled by 
1942 — Howard's hundredth birthday. The next step on the plan will be a new ad- 
ministration building. This building is to be built just to the right of Main and 
will house all administration offices, offices of the professors and sororities. The 
small recitation halls are to be torn down to make room for larger buildings. Dr. 
Neal, besides being busy with all this work, still finds time to have interviews and 



PAGE 14 




SALUTE 




DEAN PERCY P. BURNS 



THE LEADERS 



friendly chats with the students, to lend a winning smile and willing hand to each 
and discuss all student issues. Because we believe in him, appreciate his willingness 
and helpfulness, his whole-hearted interest in Howard's welfare and that of every 
student, we want to express to him our gratitude and love. 

Howard is especially fortunate in having a man like Percy Pratt Burns as its 
Dean. Having been at Howard in the capacity of student, professor, then dean, 
the history and progress of the College is closely related to the achievements of 
Dean Burns. Since his student days he has won a host of admirers and friends 
among the students. Always ready to hear and understand the problems of the stu- 
dents, never too busy to untangle some trying situation, a word from Dean Burns and 
the clouds disappear; one word of praise from him, and — well, it's a happy world 
after all. No person has quite the vocabulary to compare with that of Dean Burns, 
and many students will tell you that an informal talk from Dean Burns at the chapel 
period always makes the rest of the day a little easier. He talks in an easy man- 
ner and always with a ready wit. Every student admires him, for no man more de- 
serves the well-termed praise, "To know him is to love him," than Dean Burns. 



PAGE 15 








EVENTS 
YEAR 



THEOPHILUS R. EAGLES 

Prof. Eagles, vice-president and treas- 
urer of the College, is one of the most 
beloved professors to be found in any 
college. Always sympathetic in the 
role of treasurer, helpful as a profes- 
sor, and wise as an administrator, he 
occupies a huge space in the life of 
each and every student. 



PAGE 16 



LOUIS W. LOHR 

It might be said that Prof. Lohr hears 
more excuses and alibis than any other 
professor, by reason of chapel attend- 
ance. His field as instructor is Business 
Administration, but to the students he 
is a friend and advisor, and most of 
them will emphasize that he is a Smart 
Man. 




OF THE 



One of the most interesting events of last summer, and the initial move of Dr. 
Neal, was the Howard College Good Will Tours. These tours covered every 
point of Alabama, the purpose of which was to let the people of the State know 
about the College. Each professor took four or five students with a territory of 
five to ten towns to tour. At each town they made contacts with prospective stu- 
dents and friends and told them about the College and its program. At each 
town they were welcomed and entertained. Not only did the State learn about 
the College, but the students learned about the State. Another outstanding event 
of the school year, and a prelude to the "Battle of the Marne," was the Howard- 
Southern parade. Many new features and stunts were used, and in the above 
scene are seen the "unfortunates" who bet on Southern. Of course, history will 
promptly tell you that Howard dropped the past game, one of the very few since 
Howard began her athletic relationship with her neighboring rival. 



PAGE 17 



MAMIE MELL SMITH HALL 

Dormitory for Women, was erected 

in 1928 by A. D. Smith, in memory 

of his wife. 




FAMILIAR 



Probably the most legendary landmark of our campus is the sturdy Sherman 
Oak, many love affairs having sprung up and ripened under the shady branches of this 
beloved tree. It has witnessed countless meetings, friendly chats, and has been found 
to be an excellent resting place between the car line and Main building. Some stu- 
dents like its cool shade to study and concentrate (some thoughtful freshman class 
furnished stone benches) , while other students scientifically inclined seek the fresh 
air under its branches for respiration from the gases and odors of a busy science 
laboratory. The Science Hall has undergone a complete change from a lovely old 
colonial building to a modern red brick veneered structure. The interior has been 
renovated and much new equipment installed. Several new departments have been 
added, among which are the Cats' Infirmary and a Playground for Crippled Amoe- 
bas. Next, we point with pride to our most beautiful building — and why not? It 
houses our fair co-eds. Mamie Mell Smith Hall is also of red brick and located 
on Underwood Avenue, phone 9-2505. This dormitory will accommodate sixty-five 
girls. It is divided into eight suites comfortably furnished, each composed of a liv- 
ing room, four bed-rooms and two baths. Each suite is so arranged as to make an 
ideal place for studying, and to promote a cheerful, home-like atmosphere for 
each group of girls. The large reception room, where many of the college recep- 
tions and teas are given, is one of the most beautiful in the city. The general at- 
mosphere of the dormitory is home-like and satisfying, being convenient to Renfroe, 
the campus and the church, which is across the street. 



PAGE 18 






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LANDMARKS 



SCIENCE HALL 
The ole Science Hall, a familiar 
landmark, is being dressed in a 
new garb. The handsome red 
brick building looks so entirely 
different. 



AT HOWARD 



RUHAMA BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

The College Church, orig- 
inates all religious activi- 
ties for the students. 
Many of the dormitory 
boys and girls have their 
church membership trans- 
ferred to Ruhama during 
the school months. The 
Church is closely associ- 
ated with the College and 
is open to College devo- 
tional activities. 




PAGE 19 




BERRY FIELD AND 



THE ELIZABETHAN AMPHITHEATRE is 
the newest addition of landmarks on 
the campus. It is located just to the 
left of Causey Gymnasium and will be 
used in the future for stage produc- 
tions and student meetings. 



THE NEW 
AMPHITHEATRE 



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Berry Field, completed in 1921, and so called for its donor, Colonel W. 
A. Berry, is one of the most cherished possessions of all true Howardites. 
Howard's "at home" games were played here and at Rickwood Park until 
Legion Field was built, but is now used for scrimmage and interfraternity 
games. Berry Field has lately been beautified by rambling roses that have 
been planted around the entire fence, and might now be called Berry Rose 
Field. It is here that the boys are trained in shifts and plays. Here they 
find out that college football will make men of them. Besides being the 
home gridiron, it is also the home diamond. This year the boys enjoyed 
a new luxury — dug-outs, the latest improvement on the Field. Across from 
Berry Field is the new Causey Gymnasium, a beautiful red brick structure, 
named for Oscar S. Causey, Registrar, whose never-failing enthusiasm pro- 
pelled campaign after campaign for this addition to Howard campus. 

Completed in 1930, Causey Gymnasium was the greatest blessing ever 
presented a Howard football player. Dressing rooms, showers, and violet 
ray rooms promote to the health and well-being of our squad. The gym- 
nasium is fitted for basketball, tennis, or indoor baseball, and ample space 
for the entire student body. It is here the beloved Prof. "War Eagle" 

CAUSEY GYMNASIUM 

Eagles makes his traditional war cry at the gigantic pep meeting the night 
before the Howard-Southern game. One side of the ground floor is 
equipped with showers, lockers and facilities for the girls. On this same 
floor is the religious organizations room, "H" Club and athletic offices. 





The beauty float, Sponsors: 
Orr, Johnson, Neal. . . . Lee, 
Melvin, and Wobbles, the edi- 
tor all dressed up, The Ex, A 
smiling Co-Ed. . . . Football 
action, A trick or what? De- 
Witt Matthews, The boy, the 
book, the smile. . . . Tom 
Douglas, More pals, Triple 
Threat Sweeney, Billy Ban- 
croft. . . . Romeo's found a 
man, Metts and the Beta 
swing, Gwin and Hoover, A 
freshman gets his "dues," 
Gray. . . . Football scenes. 



I 



PAGE 22 



Football scenes. ... A rest on 
a house party, a shady nook, 
Walter, Tom. . . . What's 
this? Prof. Alec, our Student 
Body President, Pals, Cousins, 
eh? ... A student (see the 
book) , some Betas, Where's 
Romeo? . . . Just a little prac- 
tice, Jake, The Lady's Pride, 
Baby Jo, Lee and Charley, 
Pooch the Captain. . . . More 
football scenes. 




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PAGE 23 



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'ne ^moment of Ofnni- 

nilatlons \fflaste 
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of Jz>ife to X^aste — 
'Cne Stars are setting and 

the (caravan 
Starts for the J) awn of 

Crlotninq — (Jli, make 

nastel 

— Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam. 



The Entre Nous 



•/ 




Douglas, Matthews, Graves 
Brantley, Tippen, Abrams 



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS . 

Allen Douglas President 

Thomas Smith Vice-Pr evident 

Lofton Abrams Secretary 

Vernon Brantley Treasurer 

Wilbur Graves Historian 

Louise Tippen Poet 

DeWitt Matthews Prophet 



SENIORS 



PAGE 29 



The Entre Nous 



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SENIOR CLASS 

Elaine Aaron, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

B II 8, K A II 

Beta Pi Theta (4); Kappa Delta Pi (4); Book Lovers Club 
(2, 3, 4), Secretary (4); Glee Club (2, 3, 4); Piano Or- 
chestra (1, 2, 3, 4); Music Medal (1, 2, 3); Organ Medal 
(3); Honor Roll (1, 2, 3); Y. W. C. A. (1, 2, 3, 4); Candi- 
date for Degree with Honors. 

Lofton Abrams, A.B. 

OIIATCHEE, ALA. 

n K A 

Ministerial Association (1, 2. 3. 4); Junior Marshal (3); 
Band (1, 2, 3. 4); Secretary Senior Class. 

Edgar A. Almgren, B.S. 

FAIRFIELD, ALA. 



Pan-Hellenic (2 



II K *. A E A 
Alpha Epsilon Delta (2, 3, 4), Presi- 
dent (4). 



Robert Ansley, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

sN.nKe.Bne 

Marshal (1); Honor Roll (1); Cheerleader (1); "Most Ac- 
tive Freshman Boy Award" (1); Treasurer Freshman Class 
(1); Howard-Southern Parade Committee (1); Student 
Chapel Program Committee (1); Editor. Freshman Edition 
the Crimson (1); Allied Arts Club (1, 2, 3); Y. M. C. A. 
Cabinet (1, 2, 3. 4); Pianist (1); Vice-President (2); Presi- 
dent (3); "The New Co-Ed" (1); The Crimson Staff (1, 2, 3); 
Assistant Editor (2); Pi Kappa Theta (2, 3); Who's Who, 
Most Versatile (2); Most Energetic (3); Entre Nous Staff 
(2, 3); Glee Club (3); The Howard Masquers (3); "The 
Taming of the Shrew" (3); Secretary, Y. M. C. A. State 
Student Council (3); Beta Pi Theta, (3); Reporter (3); 
"Le Cuvier" (3). 



Vernon Brantley, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Ministerial Association (1, 2, 3, 4); Reporter (4); Treasurer 
Senior Class (4). 



PAGE 30 



The Entre Nous 



SENIOR CLASS 

Beulah Caudell, A.B. 

FALKVILLE, ALA. 

A A e, II K 6. A K 

Student Council (3, 41; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3); May Queen 
(1); B. S. U. Council, Secretary (1), Reporter (2, 4); Vice- 
President (3); Dramatic Club (1); Woman's Debating Team 
(1); Entre Nous Staff (1, 3, 4); Crimson Staff (1, 2, 3, 4); 
Pi Kappa Theta, Treasurer (3), Vice-President (4); Parade 
Committee (2, 3); Vice-President Delta Kappa (4); Vice- 
President State B. S. U. (2); Pan-Hellenic Council (3, 4); 
Woman's Student Government Council (3, 4); Y. W. A. 
(1, 2, 3, 4); President (2); W. A. A. (3, 4); Chairman Ten- 
nis Teams (3); Hiking Leader (2); Sophomore Tennis Team 
(2); Basketball Team (3, 4). 



Nell Virginia Clifton 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Winner of Harmony Medal (1); Winner of Piano Medal (2); 

Y. W. C. A. (1, 2, 3, 4); Book Lovers Club (2, 3, 4); Piano 

Orchestra (1, 2. 3). 



Whitmel S. Cobb, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
II K ♦ 



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Collier Crow, A.B. 



DECATUR, ALA. 
n K * 



Lillian Cunningham, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

B * A, B II 6, K A II 

Secretary Freshman Commission (1); Parade Committee (2); 
Allied Arts Club (2, 3, 4); Beta Pi Theta (2, 3, 4); Y. W. 
C. A. Cabinet (2, 3, 4); W. A. A. Board (2, 3, 4); Honor 
T.oll (1, 2. 3, 4); Kappa Delta Pi (4); Treasurer Pan- 
Hellenic (4). 



1 



PAGE 31 



The Entre Nous 



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SENIOR CLASS 

Louise Detamore, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

B <I> A 

Freshman Commission (1): W. A. A. Board (2, 3). 

Curtis Allen Douglas, A.B. 

PARRISH, ALA. 

Football (1, 2, 3); H Club (2, 3); President of Senior Class 
(4). 

Anna Stuart Dupuy, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

A Z 

Freshman Commission, President (1); Parade Committee 
(1. 2. 3. 4); Y. \V. C. A. Cabinet (1, 2. 3, 4i; Vice-President 
(3), President (4); Allhd Arts Club (3, 4); Business Man- 
ager (3); Business Manager Bull Pup (3); Pan-Hellenic 
Council (3, 4), President (4'; Delegate to Blue Ridge (4'; 
Glee Club (1); Crimson Staff (4); Business Manager Junior 
Edition Crimson (3); Member Howard College Good Will 
Tours (4); Birmingham City Pan-Hellenic Scholarship Win- 
ner (4). 

Maxine Dupuy, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

A Z 

Birmingham-Southern College (1, 2, 3); Pi Sigma Chi; Tri 

Tau; Clariosophic; Y. W. C. A. Howard (4); W. A. A.; 

Glee Club; Allied Arts Club. 

Raymond Dykes, A.B. 

ANDALUSIA, ALA. 
Ministerial Association (1. 2, 3, 4). 



PAGE 32 



The Entre Nous 



SENIOR CLASS 

Sexton Ewell, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Ministerial Association (1, 2, 3, 4 I . 

Frank Fleming, B.S. 

LUVERNE, ALA. 

II K <t> 

Honor Roll (1); Glee Club (1); Scientific Society (1); Cir- 
culation Manager Crimson (2) ; Assistant Business Manager 
Crimson (2); Instructor in Chemistry Lab. (2); Entre Nous 
Staff (3); Student Council (3); Treasurer Student Body (3); 
Instructor in Physics Lab. (3); Glee Club <4>; Band (4). 

William Jake Freeman, B.S. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

n K A 

Band (1, 2, 3. 4); Freshman Football Manager (2); Secre- 
tary Pan-Hellenic Council (3), President (4). 

Frances Fuller, A.B. 

PERRVVILLE, ALA. 

A A II 

Allied Arts Club (1, 2, 3, 4); Dormitory Council (2. 3. 4); 

Wing President (3); Vice-Pn sident (2. 4); Student Council 

(3); Secretary-Treasurer Y. W. A. (3); Dramatic Club (4); 

Junior Stunt (3). 

George Gaugel, B.S. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

A E A 

Alpha Epsilon Delta, Honcrary Pre-Med Fraternity (1). 



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PAGE 33 



The Entre Nous 






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SENIOR CLASS 

Lee Price Goff, A.B. 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 

B <f> A, A K. X A <}>, B n e 

Editor Bull Pup (2); Parade Committee (1, 2, 3); Editor 
Entre Nous (3); Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (1, 2); Secretary (3); 
Pan-Hellenic Council (3); Delta Kappa (2, 3); Woman's 
Debate Team (2, 3); Honor Roll (3); Debate Manager (3); 
Chi Delta Phi (3); Beta Pi Theta (3). 

Wilbur Graves, A.B. 

COLLINSVILLE, ALA. 

6 K N 

Band (1, 2, 3, 4); Historian Senior Class (4). 



Leila Mae Griffith, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

B S 

Y. W. C. A. (1, 2. 3, 4); Glee Club (1. 2, 3); "Charm School" 
(1); Y. W. A. (3, 4); Feature Section (4). 



Mildred Guest, A.B. 

FT. PAYNE, ALA. 

B £ O 

Piano Medal (1); Piano Orchestra (1. 2, 3, 4); V. W. i '. A. 
(1, 2, 3, 4). 



Louise Harrison, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

A A 9, A K, X A <!>. II K 

Crimson Staff (1, 3), Assistant Editor Freshman Edition (1); 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3, 2); Freshman Commission Director 
(3); Allied Arts Club (1, 3); Glee Club (1, 2), Business 
Manager (2); W. A. A. Board (1, 2); Honor Roll (1, 2l; 
Election Committee (2); Assistant Editor Bull Pup (2); 
Book Lovers Club, President (3); Chi Delta Phi, President 
(3); Entre Nous Staff (3); Howard-Montevallo Debate (2); 
Dramatic Club (3); "Will O' the Wisp" (3); Parade Com- 
mittee (3). 



PAGE 34 



The Entre Nous 



SENIOR CLASS 

Bert Kimbrough, B.S. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

e k n 

Vice-President Freshman Class (1); Basketball (1, 2, 3, 4); 
Baseball (2); Y. M. C. A. (3). 



Robert Paul Kincaid, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

2. N 

Football (1, 2. 3. 4); Basketball (1, 2); Y Team (21; Base- 
ball (1); Stunt (2). 



Harold Coleman Lamb, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

A K 

Ministerial Association (1, 2, 3, 4); Forensic Club (2); In- 
ter Collegiate Debating Council, Treasurer (3) ; Crimson 
Staff (3); Delta Kappa. Honorary Debating Fraternity, 
Treasurer (3, 4). 



Z. A. Laney, A.B. 



BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 



Football (1, 2, 3. 41, Alternate Captain (4); Baseball (1); 
H Club (2, 31. 



Richard Lucius Lyon, A.B. 

TUSCALOOSA, ALA. 

II K A 

Ministerial Association (1, 2, 3, 4); Parade Committee 
(2, 3); Chairman Street Preaching (2). 



\ 
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PAGE 35 



The Entre Nous 



V 




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1 

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SENIOR CLASS 

Florence Mae McCoy, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Alabama College (1); Spanish Club; Hikers Club; Dramatic 
club; "Beggers on Horseback"; Music Study Club; Chorus 
Club; Proctor; Swimming Club; "College Night"; Howard 
(2, 3, 4); Book Lovers Club (3, 4); Y. W. C. A. (1, 2, 3, 4); 
Glee Club (2, 3); Youth Forum (2). 



Dinnie May Mackey, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 



Y. W. C. A. (1, 2, 3, 
(4) ; Baseball Team ( 



B <I> A 

4); W. A. A. (3, 4); Kappa Delta Pi 
!, 4); Book Lovers Club (3, 4); Honor 
Roll (3). 



Ruby Kate Malone, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Honor Roll (1. 2, :; ) ; Glee Club (1, 2. 3); Book Lovers Club 

(2, 3); Y. W. C. A. (1, 2, 3). 



Ruth Manley, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

<1> M 



DeWitt Matthews, A.B. 

FLORALA, ALA. 

Forensic Council ill; Glee Club (1); Student Council (2, 4); 
Ministerial Association (1, 2, 3, 4); B. S. U. Council (2, 3, 4); 
Vice-President (2, 3); President (4); President State B. S. U. 
(3); Crimson Staff (2. 3. 4); Y. M. C. A. (2, 3. 41; Secretary 
(2); Senior Class Prophet (4). 



PAGE 36 



\ 



The Entre Nou 



SENIOR CLASS 

Herbert Russell Maulitz, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

<f> II 2, P A M 

Junior Marshal (3); Honor Roll (1, 2, 3); Candidate Cor 
Degree with Honors. 

Nina Miglionico, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Allied Arts Club (1. 2, 3); Y. W. I'. A. Cabinet (1. 2, 3); 
(lice Club Pianist (2. 3); Crimson Staff (1, 2. 3); Entre 
Nous Staff (3); Book Lovers club (1. 2, 3 ; Treasurer (3); 
Honor Roll il. 2. :>.); Freshman Marshal (1); Head Marshal 
(3); Math Medal (1); Chi Delta Phi (2, 3), Secretary (3); 
Hypatia, Vice-President (4). 

Catherine Munsell, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

<!> M 

Vice-President Freshman Class (1): Y. \Y. C. A. Cabinet 

(1. 2, 3. 4); Vice-President Women's Pan-Hellenic Council 

(4); Book Lovers Club (3. 4). 



Paul O'Neal, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Ministerial Association (1. 2 3. 4); Student Mission Band 
(1. 2. 3. 4>. 



Carl Park, B.S. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

ii k <i>. ii r m 

Glee Club (1, 4); Director (4); Pi Gamma Mil (2. 3. 4); 
Treasurer Student Body (3); Vice-President Men's Pan- 
Hellenic Coun.il (4); President Pi Gamma Mu (4); Presi- 
dent Student Body (4). 



s 
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PAGE 37 



The Entre Nous 



s 




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1 



I 



SENIOR CLASS 

R. B. Peace, A.B. 

SPRINGVILLE, ALA. 

Ministerial Association (1, 2. 3, 4); Treasurer (3); Basket- 
ball (31; Y. M. C. A. (1. 2. 3. 4); Council (3, 4); Captain 
Y. M. C. A. Basketball Team (3, 4>: House Committee Ren- 
froe Hall (3). 



Robert C. Perry, A.B. 

MONTGOMERY, ALA. 

Ministerial Association (1, 2, 3, 41; Chorister (4); Student 

Mission Band (1, 2, 3, 4); Chorister (1. 2); Allied Arts Club 

(1. 2, 4); College Chorus; B. S. U. Council (1). 



Mary Jo Phillips, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
B * A 



Charles C. Pierson, A.B. 

BIG SPRING, TEXAS 
Ministerial Association (1, 2, 3. 4); Pianist (4); Band (1. 3). 



Frances Price, B.S. 

FLORALA, ALA. 



x a 

William and Mary (1); Crimson Staff (3); Y. W. C. A. 

Cabinet (3); Book Lovers Club (2); Feature Section of 

Entre Nous (3). 



PAGE 38 



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SENIOR CLASS 

Victor M. Randolph, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

9 E N 

Baseball (1); Basketball (1, 2); Treasurer Junior Class (3); 
Pan-Hellenic Council (3, 4); Secretary-Treasurer (4). 

Anne Will Richardson, A.B. 

FT. PAYNE, ALA. 



Allied Arts Club (1, 
Secretary, Y. W. 



2 



2, 3, 4): Piano Orchestra (1, 2, 3, 4); 
A. (2); Y. W. C. A. (1, 2, 3, 4). 



Sidney Earle Rieger, B.S. 

BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

A E A. X A 2 

Alpha Epsilon Delta, Chi Alpha Sigma; Glee Club (4). 

Francis Ernest Smith, B.S. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

e k n 

Glee Club (1, 4); Crimson Staff (4); Entre Nous Staff (41; 
Vice-President Chi Alpha Sigma (4); Parade Committee (4). 

Lonnell Smith, A.B. 

COTTONWOOD, ALA. 

a a e 

Secretary Student Body (4); May Queen (2); Glee Club 
(2, 3, 4). President (4); Hypatia, Marshal (4); Woman's 
Student Government (3, 4), Secretary (4); Baptist Student 
LTnion Council (3, 4); Pianist (4); Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 
(3, 4); W. A. A. Board (3); Allied Arts Club (3, 4); '•Im- 
portance of Being Earnest" (3); Crimson Staff (3, 4); Edi- 
tor Junior Edition Crimson (3); Class Stunt (1, 2, 3); Var- 
sity Basketball (1); Class Team (2, 3); Tennis Team (2); 
Parade Committee (3). 

Lucile Smith, A.B. 

COTTONWOOD, ALA. 

A A 

Secretary Freshman Commission (1); Glee Club (2, 3, 4) 
Sophomore Tennis Champion (2); W. A. A. (2); B. S U 
Council (2); Pan-Hellenic (2, 3 1 ; Allied Arts Club '(2,' 3) 
"The Importance of Being Earnest" (2); Stunts (2, 3) 
May Queen (3); President Woman's Student Government (4) 



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The Entre Nous 



s 




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,«• -mTj 










SENIOR CLASS 

Marion Stallworth, A.B. 

BEATRICE, ALA. 

A A 6 

Varsity Basketball (1); Class Team (2); Girls H Club (1); 
W. A. A. Board (21; Junior Hockey Chairman (31; Harmony 
Medal (1); Piano Orchestra (1, 2, 3, 4); Woman's Dormi- 
tory Council. Treasurer (2); Vice-President (3); Wing Presi- 
dent (4); Baptist Student Union Council, Pianist (2), Treas- 
urer (3); Second Vice-President (4); Pan-Hellenic Council 
(2. 4); Hypatia, President (4); Class Stunt (3); Honor Roll 
(1, 2, 3). 

William Oscar Stroud, B.S. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

A E A 

Glee Club (l. 4); Alpha Epsilon Delta. Vice-President (4>. 



Ed Sweeney, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

K N 

Football (1, 2. 3. 4). Captain (4); Baseball (1, 2, 3): H 

Club (1. 2); Pan-Hellenic Council (3); President Junior 

Class (3); Who's Who, Most Popular Boy (31. 



Louise Tippen, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Ho,,k Lovers Club (1, 2, 3) Vice-President (3); Y. W. C. A. 

(1. 2); W. A. A. (3); Allied Arts Club (1. 2, 3); Glee Club 

(1, 2, 3); Publicity Chairman (3); Crimson Staff (2, 3); Entre 

Nous (3); Senior Class Poet (41. 



Odell Turner, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

A Z 

Freshman Commission (1); Dramatic Club (1); Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet (2); Girls' Glee Club (2, 3); W. A. A. (2, 3, 4). 



Leanora Vice, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

BIO 

Pan-Hellenic Council (3); "Entre Nous" Staff (3); Secre- 
tary Junior Class (3). 



PAGE 40 



The Entre Nous 



SENIOR CLASS 

Louise Walsh, B.S. 

SELMA, ALA. 
Honor Roll I 3. 4). 

Gertrude Whaley, B.S. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Freshman Commission (1): V. W. C. A. (1. 2. 3, i); Honor 
ltoll (21. 

Catherine Williams, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

B <I> A 

V. \Y. C. A. Cabinet (2, 3); \V. A. A. (2. 3); Basketball (3). 

Jennie von Nell Williams, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

B X O 

Y. \Y. C. A. (1, 2. 3. 4); Y. W. A. (3, 4); Pan-Hellenic 
Council (4); Senior Ring Committee (4 1. 

Bertha Williamson, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Honor Roll (3. 4 1. 



Annie Ruth Wynn, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

B * A 

President, Chi Delta Phi (3). 



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The Entre Nous 



oA [ma ZMater 



By Dr. George W. Macon (1884) 
Music by Prof. Paul DeLauney 



PAGE 42 



s 



Oh, Howard, Alma Mater true, 

I love thy glorious name, 
Deserving every honor due 

To an unsullied fame. \ 

I'll love thee through each fleeting breath 

For all that thou hast done, 
And in the agonies of death 

Be still thy loving son. 

Oh, Alma Mater, dear, thy life 

A treasure is to me: 
Thou, Phoenix fair, through flames and strife, 

Hast shown thy right to be. 
Since poverty has made thee rich 

And struggle made thee strong, 
I view thee in thy self-made niche, 

And burst to filial song. 

Oh, parent true, the future fair 

Must hold but good for thee, 
For hope's fruition waits thee there 

In blest reality. 
And sons like thine will make thee shine 

With glory all thine own, 
And bring to thy maternal shrine 

Not gifts of gold alone. 



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The Entre Nous 



PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS 

AS President of the Senior Class of '33, I stand as represent- 
ative before many to whom we are indebted. Realizing the 
great responsibility which is mine in trying to adequately ex- 
press our gratitude to those who have so unselfishly promoted our 
careers thus far, I should like to say: 

To you our parents, our hearts turn tenderly. We are aware 
of your boundless love and constant devotion. We realize that each 
one of our victories is lauded by each of you. We know that our 
hopes are no greater than yours for us, and we gratefully acknowl- 
edge your financial sacrifices. 

Next, we turn to the faculty. Deep is our appreciation for 
you and your profound interest in us. We remain now in deep 
consciousness of the fact that each of you has devoted your life 
to the cultivating of raw products such as we. We appreciate your 
patience, loyalty, and affection. We place the laurels of our in- 
tellectual victories unhesitatingly at your feet. 

To those who are just a few steps behind us we leave these 
words in passing: May the bond of friendly love that has rooted 
itself among us expand over the years to come into one unbroken 
chain of loyal friendship. Undergraduates, we bid thee an affec- 
tionate farewell. 

Then, as classmates we turn to each other with regretful 
thoughts, realizing that this is the moment which is to rend asunder 
the tie of fraternal love in its associated sense. I believe I express 
the sentiment of each heart when I say that these have been four 
years of fond friendship and that we mingle a few bitter tears 
with anticipation for the future on realizing that we must part. 

We bid each of you farewell. We look ambitiously toward 
the future, knowing our field is the world and our success is de- 
pendent upon our adaptation. In God's keeping we go. 

Allen Douglas. 



PAGE 43 



The Entre Nous 



HISTORY OF SENIOR CLASS 

AS the chronicler meditates upon the events of the four years of his college 
career, he is at once beset by the static impressions of numerous linger- 
* ing memories, by a hodgepodge of confused reactions, and by innumerable 
cross-currents of conflicting remnants of past events. The task at first seems 
hopeless and entirely beyond the limited abilities of the narrator. He strug- 
gles vainly to coordinate the scattered fragments of the past; but he realizes 
that each distinctive event of the past — the pathetic, the hilarious, and the 
romantic — all alike have been tinted with the pale hue of passing time; that 
all their peculiarly individualistic qualities have been obliterated by the in- 
evitable generalities of time. But soon the confusion of first impression passes, 
and the chronicler assumes a calmer mood. Assuming the philosophical role, 
he concludes that the best of these memories may be perpetuated through the 
medium of history. The task of recording the story of the class of 1932-33, 
therefore, becomes one of assimilating definite facts and of recording concrete 
events which have been instrumental in the shaping of the destinies of our class. 

The class of 1932-33 is the 88th (eighty-eighth) graduating class of Howard 
College ; and the numerical designation alone is a sufficient basis for disting- 
uishing this class from other classes of more recent years. This class bears a 
very remarkable resemblance to all those classes of preceding years. The total 
membership, the composite list of honors attained in college ; and the aggregate 
potentialities of the class of 1932-33 compare surprisingly with those classes of 
the last two decades — the only distinctive basis being in the peculiarities of in- 
dividual personalities. 

The class as a whole began its quest for a higher education in the fall 
semester of 1929 as a composite body of over three hundred members. Since 
that time the personnel of the class has been subjected to constant revision. 
The ranks have been thinned through the inability of part of the original 
membership to remain in school, as well as through transfer of others to other 
schools, and even the sinister hand of death and disaster has claimed its toll. 
On the other hand, our depleted ranks have been supplemented through the 
addition of students from other schools, with the final results that more than 
one hundred have filed applications for degrees this spring. 

Our group began the pursuit of their ambitions mid scenes of changing and 
unsettled industrial conditions which have grown continually worse. Ours 
has been a time of unrest, or irresolution, of vicissitudes, of mental uneasiness, 
and of pessimistic forebodings of events beyond the horizon of graduation. It 
had required a great deal of fortitude to maintain our original scholastic ideals 



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amid these adverse industrial conditions. Those who have done so, will un- 
doubtedly be recompensed for their faith, through a more thorough preparation 
to fight the battles of life. 

Our class has witnessed a change in the presidency of Howard College. 
This shift in the administrative personnel was occasioned by the resignation of 
Dr. John C. Dawson on September 29, 1930 after almost ten years of tenure. 
The vacancy was supplied by Vice-President Eagles until the permanent selec- 
tion of Dr. T. V. Neal, who assumed the administrative duties of his position 
in June of 1932. 

Many of the members of our group have compiled long lists of student 
activities and have made distinctive contributions to the history of Howard 
College. Some of these achievements have been recognized by the plaudits of 
the group; while others, no less deserving, have passed unnoticed, unobserved, 
and unappreciated. Truly distinctive among the honors accumulated by th; 
class, are some which stand out as being worthy of special mention. Carl Park 
was honored with the presidency of the student body. Dewitt Matthews was 
named president of the state-wide B. S. U. organization; and Eddie Sweeney 
was finally rewarded for his brilliant feats on the gridiron by the captaincy of 
his team. 

We extend our heartiest congratulations to our class-mates Herbert Maulitz, 
Nina Miglionico, Mary Claire Randall, and Elaine Aaron who have successfully 
qualified for the candidacy for degrees with honors. 

No class history is complete until a summary of the annual football feud 
with our rivals across town has been included. Unfortunately the even tenor 
of the victories of former years has been interrupted by the discordant lamenta- 
tions of two Southern victories during the four year span of our sojourn at 
Howard. The Howard cohorts were victorious during '29 and '31; while 
Southern won the other two decisions. 

The tale is told; the curtain is drawn upon our career at Howard College; 
the class of 1932-33 aligns itself with its predecessors; and the siege is pre- 
pared for the continuation of the act with a different cast of actors. 



PAGE 45 



UNDERGRADUATE CLASS 
OFFICERS 



JUNIOR CLASS 

Roy Fayet President 

Mary Burl Reedy Vice-President 

Ben Fontille Secretary 

Paul Gwin Treasurer 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 

Copeland Graves President 

Fred Phillips Vice-President 

Isabelle Davies Secretary 

Clara McEachern Treasurer 

FRESHMAN CLASS 

Henry Allen Parker President 

Pete Allen Vice-President 

Ann Berry Secretary 

J. B. King Treasurer 



PAGE 46 



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and 



Other Classes 



PAGE 47 



The Entre Nous 



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JUNIOR CLASS 



Joseph Anderson 



Thomasville, Ala. 



Mary Elizabeth Anderson . Thomasville, Ala. 
A A II 

Judson College (i, 2); Vice-President Dramatic Club 

(2); "Lady Windermere's Fan" (3); "The Taming 

of the Shrew" (3). 



Melvin Bentley Bessemer, Ala. 

2 N 
Citadel (1); Cheer Leader (2, 3); Who's Who (3). 

Mada Berry Birmingham, Ala. 

a a e, a k, b n e 

Birmingham News Scholarship; Freshman Commis- 
sion (1) ; Freshman Commission Director (2) ; W. A. 
A. Board (2) ; Book Lovers Club (1, 2, 3) ; Reporter 
(3); V. W. C. A., Treasurer (3); Crimson Staff 
(2, 3); Entre Nous Staff (3); Glee Club (2, 3). 



Dorothy Cason 



Birmingham, Ala. 



A Z 



V. W. C. A. Cabinet (3); Basketball (1, 2, 3); 
Manager of Freshman Athletics (1); Baseball 
(1, 2, 3); Captain (1); W. A. A. Board (1, 2, 3); 
Manager Track (3); Vice-President Woman's Stu- 
dent Government (3); Student Council (3); Honor 

Roll (2, 3). 



Kathleen Cooner . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

Book Lovers Club (2, 3); Glee Club (2, 3); W. A. 
A. (1, 2, 3); Mission Band, Secretary (3). 



Ellison Cosby Birmingham, Ala. 

Baptist Student Union, Chorister (2) ; Physics Lab- 
oratory Assistant Instructor (2, 3). 



Thomas Douglas .... Birmingham, Ala. 

2 N 



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JUNIOR CLASS 



Roy Edward Fayet Ensley, Ala. 

n K A 

Football (i, 2, 3), Captain-Elect (3); Baseball (i, 3) 

Pan-Hellenic Council (3) ; President Junior Class (3) 

Treasurer Sophomore Class (2); Who's Who (3) 

Entre Nous Staff (2); Crimson Staff (1, 3). 



Dorothy Galloway 



. Pineville, Ky. 



A Z 



Treasurer Women's Dormitory Council (3); Y. W. 
A., Vice-President (2); Women's Student Council (3). 



Charley Hulsey Guin, Ala. 

e k n 

Football (1, 2, 3), Captain (1); Basketball (1); H 
Club (2, 3). 

Hazel Johnson .... Birmingham, Ala. 
a a e 

Y. W. C. A. (i, 2, 3) ; Vice-President Freshman Com- 
mission (1); Basketball (1); Honor Roll (2); Piano 
Orchestra (2); Sponsor Howard-Chattanooga Game 

(3). 



Sam Jones Pine Apple, Ala. 

n k * 

Lamar Kennedy Brundidge, Ala. 

9 K N 

President of Student Body (3) ; Y. M. C. A. Council 
(3); Pan-Hellenic Council (3). 



Elizabeth Kronenberg . . Brookside, Ala. 
n k e, x a $, b n e 

Crimson Staff (1, 2, 3); Secretary, Pi Kappa Theta 

(3); Book Lovers Club (1, 2, 3), Publicity Director 

(3) ; Treasurer, Chi Delta Phi (3) ; Girls' Glee Club 

(1, 2, 3) ; Honor Roll (1, 2) 

Larry B. Larrimore . . . Dickinson, Ala. 

2 * E 

Ministerial Association (1); Mission Band (1); 
Winner of Non Shave Contest (3). 





I 29> 







-cp- 




PAGE 49 




The Entre Nous 



Olc 



*\Gl 



-*m 












JUNIOR CLASS 



Winston Legge Athens, Ala. 

2 N 

Majel Mangun .... Birmingham, Ala. 

a z, n k e, a k 

Crimson Staff (i, 2, 3) ; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (2, 3) ; 
VV. A. A. Board (1, 2, 3), Reporter (2, 3); Basket- 
ball (1, 2, 3); Hockey (1, 2); Swimming (1, 2, 3); 
Tennis (1, 2); Entre Nous Staff (3); Inter-col- 
legiate Debating Council, Secretary (2) ; Delta Kappa, 
Secretary (2), Debate Manager (3) ; Allied Arts Club, 
"The New Co-Ed" (1); "The Importance of Being 
Earnest" (2) ; B. S. U. Council, Reporter (2) ; Pan- 
Hellenic (3); Assistant in Women's Physical Educa- 
tion Department. 

Marjorie Mauney . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

A Z, B II O, K A n 
Allied Arts Club (1, 2, 3); Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 
(1, 2, 3) Vice-President (3) ; Beta Pi Theta, Secre- 
tary-Treasurer (3); W. A. A. (1, 2, 3); Glee Club 
(1); Honor Roll (1); Business Manager Sophomore 
Edition Crimson (2) ; Crimson Staff (2) ; Entre Nous 
Staff (3); Parade Committee (3); Student Council 
(3); Stunt Committee (2); "Lady Windermere's Fan" 
(3) ; Editor, The Bull Pup (3). 



Edward Mason 



Columbus Grove, Ohio 



2 N 



Mildred Maxwell . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

A Z 
Judson College (1, 2); Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (1); 
Art Club, French Club; Y. W. A., Secretary, Vice- 
President; Howard, Allied Arts Club (3). 

Dorothy McKinney . . Birmingham, Ala. 

W. A. A., Publicity Manager (3) ; Book Lovers Club 
(2, 3) ; Honor Roll (3). 

Mary Nunnelley . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

A Z 

Allied Arts Club (1, 2, 3). 

John Miglionico .... Birmingham, Ala. 

A K 

Delta Kappa (2, 3) ; Sophomore Marshal (2) ; Head 

Marshal (3); Mathematics Medal (1); Honor Roll 

(1, 2, 3); Piano Orchestra (1). 

Alvan Outland .... Birmingham, Ala. 
n k a 

Entre Nous Staff (2, 3) ; Crimson Staff (3) ; Y. M. 
C. A. Cabinet (3) ; Business Manager, Bull Puf> (3). 



PAGE 50 



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te)|c 



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JUNIOR CLASS 



Dixie Lenora Patten . . Birmingham, Ala. 

B * A, B II e 

Allied Arts Club (i, 2, 3); Dramatic Club (3); 

"The New Co-Ed" ( 1 ) ; University of Chattanooga 

(2); "Ladv Windermere's Fan" (3); "Taming of 

the Shrew" (3); Stunt (3); Beta Pi Theta (3). 

Mary Burl Reedy . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

B 2 
Vice-President Junior Class (3); Y. W. C. A. 

(I, 2, 3 ). 

Henry Smith .... Alexander City, Ala. 
n k * 

Student Council (2); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (2); B. 

S. U. Council (2, 3); Treasurer (3); Football (1); 

Entre Nous Staff (2) ; Business Manager Entre 

Nous (3). 

Edna Stewart Birmingham, Ala. 

A A e 
Sophomore Marshal (2); Allied Arts Club (3); 
Book Lovers Club (3); Glee Club (1, 2, 3); Fresh- 
man Commission (1); Honor Roll (2, 3). 

{Catherine Upshaw . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

B * A, A K, K A n 
Delta Kappa (3); W. A. A. (1, 2, 3); Allied Arts 
Club (2, 3) ; Y. W. C. A. (i, 2, 3) ; Entre Nous 
Staff (3) ; Book Lovers Club (3) ; Kappa Delta Pi (3). 

E. T. Waldrond, Jr. . . Birmingham, Ala. 
n k a 

Basketball (1); Band (1, 2, 3); Baseball (3); Pan- 
Hellenic Council (2, 3) ; President Sophomore Class 
(2); Vice-President Student Body (3). 

Joe Mike Wells Andalusia, Ala. 

n k A 

Football (1, 2, 3), Alternate-Captain Elect (3). 

Walt Whitman Elba, Ala. 

e x 

Transfer from Auburn; Pharmacy Course. 

Ellostein Wright . . . Birmingham, Ala. 
k a n 

Glee Club (2, 3); Crimson Staff (3); W. A. A. 

(2, 3); Y. W. C. A. (1, 2, 3); Book Lovers Club 

(2, 3) ; Kappa Delta Pi. 



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tf>h= 



a|S5 




I -I 




SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Sara Allred Birmingham, Ala. 

Secretary Freshman Class (i); Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 

(2); Vice-President Student Mission Band (2); Book 

Lovers Club (2). 



John Barnes Mobile, Ala. 



Elizabeth Bobo .... Birmingham, Ala. 
B 2 O 

Y. W. C. A. (1, 2, 3); W. A. A. (i, 2). 

Theo Bozeman .... Birmingham, Ala. 

B * A 

^eta Pi Theta (2); Y. W. C. A. (1, 2); President 

W. A. A. (3); Baseball (1, 2), Manager (2); 

Basketball '', 2), Manager (2); Hockey (1, 2), 

Captain (2). 



Howard Bryant 



. . . Birmingham, Ala. 

Ministerial Association (1, 2); President Student Mis- 
sion Band (2) ; B. S. U. Council (2) ; Tennis (2) ; 
Secretary Mission Band (2). 



Aileen Carlton .... Birmingham, Ala. 
a a n 



Frances Carlton .... Birmingham, Ala. 
B * A 



Ruth Carver Birmingham, Ala. 

A Z, A K 
Secretary Freshman Class (1); Delta Kappa (2). 



Paul Cox Clanton, Ala. 

n K * 

Basketball (1) ; Tennis Team (1, 2) ; Student Council 
(2). 



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tf>|E 



a|G} 



'I 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Isabella Davies .... Birmingham, Ala. 

B 2 

Secretary Sophomore Class (2) ; Stunt Committee (2) ; 
Y. W. C. A. (1, 2) ; Y. W. A. (i, 2). 



Virginia Eagles 



. Birmingham, Ala. 

A Z 

Second Vice-President Freshman Commission (1) 
Basketball (1); Manager Hockey (1); Baseball (2) 
"Thursday Evening" (1); "Ladv Windermere's Fan 
(2); Allied Arts Club (1, 2); Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 
(2); W. A. A. Board (2); Howard Masquers (2). 



James Edwards Mobile, Ala. 

n k a 

Band (1, 2); Assistant Business Manager Crimson 
(2); Editor Freshman Edition Crimson (1); Glee 
Club Orchestra (2) ; Stunt (2) ; Pa>\? ' Committee 
(2) ; Tennis (2) ; Track (2 



Frances Flinn Birmingham, Ala. 

A A e 

Allied Arts Club (i, 2), Secretary (2); Y. W. C. A. 
(1, 2). 



Tom Forrester Birmingham, Ala. 

Cheer Leader (1); Crimson Staff (1, 2). 

Copeland Graves .... Blountsville, Ala. 
n k * 

President Sophomore Class (2); Baseball (2). 

Evelyn Grimmer .... Birmingham, Ala. 
* M 

Ruby Hagood Birmingham, Ala. 

Walter Harper .... Birmingham, Ala. 
n k a 



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C&P 



=16} 




m r 




SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Everett Ingram Ashland, Ala. 

n K * 

Evelyn Calhoun Johnson . Birmingham, Ala. 

1! 2 

V. W. C. A. Cabinet (2) ; Secretary Women's Pan- 
Hellenic Council (2); Y. W. A. (1, 2). 

Eunice Long Haleyville, Ala. 

Clarence Manning . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

Bess McComas Birmingham, Ala. 

<I> M 

President Freshman Commission (1); Business Man- 
ager Freshman Edition Crimson (1) ; Honor Roll (1) ; 
Outstanding Freshman Girl Medal (1); Parade Com- 
mittee (1, 2); Assistant Editor Entre Nous (2). 

Lucius Phillip McCurdy . . . Ensley, Ala. 

2 * E 

Men's Pan-Hellenic Council (2). 

Clara McEachern .... Louisville, Ala. 

* M 

Birmingham News Scholarship; First Vice-President 
Freshman Commission (1); Y. W. A. President (2); 
W. A. A. (2) ; Woman's Student Government, Secre- 
tary (2); B. S. U. Council (1, 2), Secretary (2); 
Treasurer Sophomore Class (2); Honor Roll (1, 2). 

Hazel Pawson Birmingham, Ala. 

A Z 

President Freshman Commission (1); Secretary W. 
A. A. (2) ; Student Council (2) ; Tennis Chairman 

(2). 

Fred Phillips Birmingham, Ala. 

n K A 

Vice-President Sophomore Class (2). 



PAGE 54 



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SOPHOMORE CLASS 

■▼■ 

Jane Pratt Birmingham, Ala. 

Marjorie Roper .... Birmingham, Ala. 

* M 

Aubrey Sanders Parrish, Ala. 

e k x 

Freshman Football Manager (i); Assistant Manager 
Varsity (2), Manager-Elect (3). 

Leonte Saye Ensley, Ala. 

A Z 

Allied Arts Club (1, 2); Freshman Commission (1); 

Orchestra (1); "The Importance of Being Earnest" 

(1) ; Chemistry Lab. Assistant (1) ; Honor Roll (1, 2) ; 

Secretary-Treasurer Chi Alpha Sigma (2). 

Claude Smith, Jr Mentone, Ala. 

Allied Arts Club (1, 2); Delta Kappa (2); Glee 
Club (1, 2) ; Band (2). 

Evelyn Suddeth .... Birmingham, Ala. 
<I> M 

James Turner Birmingham, Ala. 

2 * E 

Reba Wear Birmingham, Ala. 

* M 



a 



SP 



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FRESHMAN CLASS 

•w 

Evelyn Ansley .... Birmingham, Ala. 
* M 

Delta Kappa (i); Allied Arts Club (i); Student 

Council (i); Chairman Freshman Stunt (i); Y. W. 

C. A. (i). 

Charles Barnes .... Birmingham, Ala. 

Ann Berry Birmingham, Ala. 

a a e 

Secretary Freshman Class (i) ; Delta Kappa (i) ; 
B. S. U. Council (i) ; W. A. A. (i) ; V. W. C. A. 
(i); Y. W. A. (i); Allied Arts Club (i); Basket- 
ball (i); Baseball (i); Book Lovers Club (i); 
Honor Roll (i). 

Otho Bruce Birmingham, Ala. 

2 N, A K 
Delta Kappa (i); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (i). 

Newell Bryan Nashville, Tenn. 

A Z 

Wilma Collins .... Birmingham, Ala. 

Jeselyn Davis Birmingham, Ala. 

Paul Davis Birmingham, Ala. 

Ernest Ellis Birmingham, Ala. 

Mabel Etheridge .... Town Creek, Ala. 

A Z 

John Fenn Birmingham, Ala. 

e k n 



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FRESHMAN CLASS 

Thomas Floyd Birmingham, Ala. 

2 N 

Thomas Garner .... Birmingham, Ala. 
n k a 

Virginia Glaze .... Birmingham, Ala. 
B * A 

Margaret Godwin . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

A Z 

Allied Arts Club (i); Glee Club (i); Y. W. C. A. 
d). 

Mildred Godwin .... Birmingham, Ala. 

A Z 

Allied Arts Club (i); Glee Club (i); Y. W. C. A. 

(i). 

Charles J. Granade . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

Margaret Hogan .... Birmingham, Ala. 
* M 

Glee Club (i) ; Y. W. C. A. (i). 

Elizabeth Hoover . . . Birmingham, Ala. 
A Z 

Herman Ingram Sylacauga, Ala. 

Frances Kinne Birmingham, Ala. 

A Z 

Campbell Kidd Birmingham, Ala. 

2 N 

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=16} 




- 







FRESHMAN CLASS 

▼ 

J. B. King Birmingham, Ala. 

2 N 

Treasurer Freshman Class (i) ; Allied Arts Club (i) ; 
Glee Club. 

Evalyn Looney .... Birmingham, Ala. 

* M 

Allied Arts Club; Book Lovers Club; Y. W. C. A. 

Robert McCarty Dothan, Ala. 

n K <i> 

Freshman Football; Boxing Team; Glee Club. 

Lillie Mae McLaney . . Birmingham, Ala. 

Grace Mangun .... Birmingham, Ala. 

A Z 

Secretary-Treasurer Freshman Commission. 

Lucile Metts Birmingham, Ala. 

B * A 

Roy Myrick Sylacauga, Ala. 

O K N 

Henry Allen Parker .... Mobile, Ala. 

II K *, A K 

President Freshman Class; Freshman Cheer Leader; 
Allied Arts Club; Delta Kappa; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet. 

Ellen Mae Perry .... Birmingham, Ala. 
B 2 O 

Nemira Pilson Birmingham, Ala. 

2 I X 

Lucile Raiford Birmingham, Ala. 

B * A 



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FRESHMAN CLASS 

Margaret Reinhart . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

Varina Shelton .... Birmingham, Ala. 

A Z 

Mary Jo Slaughter . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

B 2 

Allied Arts Club; Glee Club; Y. W. C. A. 

James Sutherland . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

Dorothy Walker . . . Birmingham, Ala. 
* M 

Elizabeth Weakley . . . Birmingham, Ala. 
A A n 

Dorothy Wilder .... Birmingham, Ala. 
B $ A 

Mildred Wilkinson . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

B * A 

Vice-President Freshman Commission; Entre Nous 
Staff; Allied Arts Club; Glee Club. 

Levert Williams .... Birmingham, Ala. 

James Wittmeir Oneonta, Ala. 

2 N 

Maria Woods Birmingham, Ala. 

Joe Wurtele Ensley, Ala. 

2 N 

PAGE 59 



' 



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k, mif Jjeloved, fill the 
C/up that clears 

X^ooai) of past dcearets and 
future zsears 

lOomorrowv OYhy, tomor- 
row U may be 

Jrlyself with yesterday s 
Sev n X^housano years. 

— Rubdiyat of Omar Khayyam. 



The Entre Nous 








. 





THE COACHES 

L P. McLANE 

Coach "Eddie" has completed his sixth year as a member of the 

Howard coaching staff. Four of these years he has been head coach. 

During this time he has gained the respect and esteem of each team, 

student body, and faculty member. 

WILBUR EATON 

Wilbur Eaton's second year as assistant coach increased his reputation 
as a thoroughly capable leader and instructor. 

WILLIAM H. BANCROFT 

Coach "Billy's" freshman coaching has been of the same A-l quality 
as that of his undergraduate career. 



PAGE 65 



FOOTBALL ROSTER 




Ed 


Sweeney, Captain 




"Shag" 


Laney, 


Alternate-Captain 
• 
C. Cunningham 




Harvey Moore . . . 


Back 


Guard 


Aubrey Gresham 


Back 


Don Mosher 


Guard 


Roy Kennedy 


Back 


Paul Kincaid 


Guard 


Hubert Thomason 


Back 


Stanley Mate ... 


Guard 


Norman Garrett 


Back 


Dewitt Dunn ... 


Tackle 


Worley Field 


Back 


Jonah Anderson 


Tackle 


Horace Guttery 


Back 


Jim Stuart 


End 


Charley Hulsey 


Back 


Roy Fayet 


End 


Chester Macomber 


Back 


Russell Garrett 


.End 


Dade Snellgrove 


Back 


Thomas Lawson 


End 


Ben Fontille 


Back 


Ellison Cosby 


End 


Hickman Ewing 


Back 


Fred Phillips 


End 


Howard Abrams 


Back 


Mike Wells 


. Guard 


Tom Everetts 


Back 


Preston Langston 


Guard 


Ray Holmstedt 


Center 


Odell Scifres ... 


Tackle 


Bab Glenn 


Center 


Bill Staples 


Tackle 


Roland Bailey 


Center 


Al Brown 


Tackle 


Gordon Garrett Tackle 




Jack 


Osborne Tackle 




Olin 


Kelso 


Tackle 





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VARSITY SQUAD 



THE VARSITY 



ROY KENNEDY, QUARTERBACK. Roy's sig- 
nal-calling and passing was good all year. His 
ability to kick came as a surprise to everyone. 

HUBERT THOMASON, QUARTERBACK. Hu- 
bert has made himself valuable to the team for 
his passing and blocking as well as for his 
ability to carry the ball. 

NORMAN GARRETT, QUARTERBACK. "Red'' 
has the advantage of being the only left-handed 
quarterback. His running and passing is good ; 
he is a heady signal-caller. 

HORACE GUTTERY, HALFBACK. During 
Swneeney's time out on account of injuries, it fell 
to Horace's lot to fill his place. He did the job 
exceedingly well. 

CHARLIE HULSEY, HALFBACK. Charlie 
again played a brilliant game at half. His 
punting pulled Howard out of many holes. His 
running was also excellent. 

TOM EVERETTS, HALFBACK. Tom is the 
speediest man on the team and a fine pass re- 
ceiver. He showed his heels to many teams this 
year. 

RAY HOLMSTEDT, CENTER. This was Ray's 
first year of varsity competition and he proved 
himself to be a powerhouse in the center of the 
line. 



ROLAND BAILEY, CENTER. Bailey is one of 
the smallest men to play center at Howard in 
years, but opponents found him a miniature Gi- 
braltar in action. 

CHESTER MACOMBER, HALFBACK. "Cher" 
was unlucky enough to get a sprained ankle 
early in the season. His great speed and power 
should make him go good next year. 

DADE SNELLGROVE, HALFBACK. Dade's 
speed made him a good halfback. He is pos- 
sessed of an uncanny ability in snaring passes. 

BEN FONTILLE, FULLBACK. Ben played fine 
football all year. His speed and power were a 
big help to the team. He has been playing and 
will play football. 

HICKMAN EWING, FULLBACK. Hick has, in 
spite of his size, made a great name for him- 
self as a fullback. He is a good tackier and 
powerful on line plays and blocking. He plays 
the game all the way. 

HOWARD ABRAMS, FULLBACK. Howard is 
a fine punter and good ball carrier. He should 
run a good race for a regular berth next year. 

DON MOSHER, GUARD. Don made a fine 
guard in spite of several injuries during the 
year. Oglethorpe players will remember him. 

STANLEY MATE, GUARD. Although he has 
been dogged by injuries ever since he started 
playing football, Mate's shoulders held up long 
enough for him to get in some good football. 



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FRESHMAN SQUAD 



THE VARSITY 



DEWITT DUNN, TACKLE. "Bull" was changed 
to tackle this jear and seemed to take well to 
his new position. He will make a good man 
next year. 

JONAH ANDERSON, TACKLE. "Red," with 
his great size, should come through and hold 
down a steady tackle berth next year. 

JIM STUART, END. Jim, though a sopho- 
more, played great football all year. His ability 
to kick extra points won the Southwestern game 
for Howard. 

ROY FAYET, END. Although "Pooch" is the 
smallest man on the squad, his end play has been 
nothing short of brilliant. He is to be captain 
next year. 

RUSSELL GARRETT, END. Russell has made a 
name for himself as a fine blocker and tackier. 
His end play is ioo per cent reliable. 

THOMAS LAWSON, END. "Swede" had a 
season of changes. His changes from end to 
guard and back again kept him working harder 
than anyone on the squad to keep himself 
adapted. 

ELLISON COSBY, END. Ellison found the go- 
ing rather tough at end this year. With the year 
of added experience though, he should make a 
valuable man next year. 



FRED PHILLIPS, END. Fred is a good, small 
end. He had the bad fortune to have a knee 
hurt about mid-season, but should make a valu- 
able man next year. 

MIKE WELLS, GUARD. Mike's size has noth- 
ing to do with his ability. He played fine foot- 
ball all year. His game against Auburn was 
outstanding. He is alternate captain for next 
year. 

PRESTON LANGSTON, GUARD. This was 
Langston's first varsity year. He shows excellent 
prospects of being a fine guard next year. 
Watch him ! 

ODELL SCIFRES, TACKLE. "Arky" played his 
usual scintillating game this year. The Bull- 
dogs will miss him sorely next year. 

BILL STAPLES, TACKLE. Bill was missed ter- 
ribly in the four games from which he was ab- 
sent due to his infected knee. Bill's performance 
at tackle was nice to watch. 

JACK OSBORNE, TACKLE. "Sunny Jack" 
came through with a bang at both guard and 
tackle at times of stress. His last-half play 
against Millsaps was fine. 

OLIN KELSO, TACKLE. Although Olin is the 
smallest one of the smallest tackles on the team, 
his power, agility and heads-up football made 
him a valuable man. 



PAGE 69 



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1932 VARSITY SEASON 



The Howard College Bulldogs opened 
their 1932 grid schedule under the lights 
at Legion Field, and won from the Spring 
Hill Badgers, 13 to 0. Spring Hill's big 
boys were not able to get going, whereas 
Howard finally hit their stride and scored 
two touchdowns in the final period of the 
game. The game was closely contested, 
but the Crimsons had the upper hand 
throughout the fray. The entire squad was 
used. 

The next game, on Friday night, Sep- 
tember 23, was played against Coach 
Harry Robinson's Oglethorpe Petrels in 
Atlanta, Georgia. Howard upset the old 
dope bucket and won the game by a score 
of 14-6. This game was the best game 
played by the Bulldogs during the entire 



season and showed prospects of a bright 
season. Oglethorpe's heavier team was 
completely outfought and the Bulldogs de- 
served great credit for beating this excel- 
lent team. Gordon Garrett and Bob Glenn 
played outstanding games in the line, as did 
Sweeney, Gresham, and Ewing in the back- 
field. 

The Mercer Bears of Macon, Georgia, 
were Howard's next opponents, on Satur- 
day, October 1. The game ended 21-6 in 
favor of Mercer. In the first half, the 
game was all Mercer's, but in the second 
half it was mostly Howard's. Two fea- 
tures of this game were long touchdown 
runs on intercepted forward passes by 
"Pinky" Walden, flashy Bear back, and 
Hick Ewing, Crimson fullback. The 



PAGE 70 



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heavy, powerful attack was too much for 
the Bulldogs, although there was never a 
slacking in their fight. 

The next game on the Bulldog docket 
was with the University of Mississippi. 
Another hefty combination succeeded in 
handing Howard a 26-6 defeat. Howard 
was ahead 6-0 at the half, but Walker's 
Ole Miss squad came back with a smash 
to pile up 26 points in the last two periods. 
Old Man Luck was certainly their standby, 
because two of their touchdowns came on 
utterly freakish plays. Howard lost, but 
the Mississippians didn't need to be told 
that they had played a tough game. This 
game was played in Oxford, Miss., on Sat- 
urday, October 8. 

Next came one of Howard's longest 
football trips. The Bulldogs played the 
Nodaks of the University of North Da- 



kota in Grand Forks, N. D., on October 
15. En route to Grand Forks the team 
worked out in Chicago's Soldier Field, and 
listened to America's Ben Bernie "and all 
the lads" in the College Inn of the Hotel 
Sherman. The game was played in snowy 
weather with a north wind of gale propor- 
tions blowing throughout the afternoon. 
North Dakota's 196-pound team proved 
too much for the Crimson's much lighter 
one. The final score was: Nodaks, 39; 
Bulldogs, 7. 

Chattanooga's champion Moccasins were 
played in Birmingham, Saturday, October 
22. Coach Moore's scrappy outfit an- 
nexed another Howard scalp and took the 
game, 19-0. It was at about this time that 
Old Man Injuries found lodging in the 
Bulldog wigwam and made things lively 
for the medicine man. Chattanooga 




PAGE 71 



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showed a smoothly clicking outfit to Bir- 
mingham fans, and took this nicely played 
game. 

On October 29, Howard travelled over 
to Memphis to take Southwestern's Lynx 
for a 14-13 ride. Jim Stuart's toe was re- 
sponsible for the two extra points which 
gave the Bulldogs their one-point margin 
of victory. It was not until the last eight 
minutes of play that Harvey Moore 
sounded the note that started the zero hour 
passing and running barrage that won the 
game. This game had as an added attrac- 
tion a free-for-all in which the Memphis 
fans co-starred. This incident, however, 
was not a novelty, for it seems that fight- 
ing is the fad for fans this year. 

Saturday, November 5, saw the Bull- 
dogs in Montgomery engaged in a game 
with the Auburn Tigers, strong Southern 



Conference eleven. This team succeeded 
in defeating Howard 25-0 (one spinner, 
one off-tackle play, two passes, and one ex- 
tra point) . Tom Everetts showed the Cats 
his speedy heels several times in running 
and catching passes. Hitchcock was not his 
usual superior self, but Casey Kimbrell and 
Allen Rogers kept the Dogs worried most 
of the time. This game showed Howard's 
best defensive play of the season, at times. 
On three different occasions the Crimsons, 
while backed up against their own six-yard 
stripe, succeeded in holding Auburn for 
downs. Mike Wells played the best game 
of his college career. 

The dope bucket was upset on Howard 
in Jackson, Miss., November 11, by the 
Millsaps Majors. They defeated the Bull- 
dogs 19-0 on a sloppy, half -frozen field in 
which fast-moving cleats refused to take 



PAGE 72 



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hold. The Majors showed a suspected but 
unexpected powerful attack with which 
they were able to make good gains over the 
Howard line. They also had good luck 
with their passing attack, whereas the Bull- 
dogs were not very successful in any field. 
A 72-yard punt from behind his goal line 
by Charley Hulsey was a feature of the 
game. 

And then came the Battle of the Marne 
on November 19. Birmingham-Southern 
took this game, 7-0, and, by so doing, 
walked off with its first Dixie Conference 
Championship. The Hilltoppers scored 
their lone touchdown on a short pass over 
the goal line early in the game. On sev- 
eral occasions Howard backs broke loose 
with only Masten O'Neal, Southern safety 
man, between them and goaldom, but 



"Sloppy's" tackles were always accurate. 
As is usual, the game was a close one, hard 
fought. Howard's record in this particular 
series is three losses since the season of 
1916, and six losses since 1907, when the 
annual games were started. 

This season, as far as games won and 
lost was concerned, was not highly success- 
ful, but praise is due to the coaching staff 
and every member of the football squad 
for the ambition, courage, and spirit that 
enabled them to give all they had for 
Howard. 

This year closed the careers of a number 
of Bulldog football players. Brown, Gres- 
ham, A. Douglas, Moore, Laney, Staples, 
Scifres, Kincaid, Glenn, Cunningham, 
Sweeney, G. Garrett, and Fields graduate 
this year. They will be missed when prac- 
tice starts next September. 



'/ 




PAGE 73 



FOOTBALL 
SENIORS 



Aubrey Gresham 

Quarterback 

In spite of his serious operations, 

his playing was excellent. 

Ed Sweeney 

Half, Captain 

Two years an All-Dixie Conference 

pick, a triple threat. 

Paul Kincaid 

Guard 

A hard fighter, a consistent player. 

Bob Glenn 

Center 

An excellent pivot man, dependable 

and hard to move. 

Z. A. Laney 

Guard, Alternate Captain 

Always steady, cool and consistent, 

a power to the line. 




'•*- 




Ki J N C Al D 




GLENN 



LAN E V 



SALUTING THE 




p 



MOOfhE 



FOOTBALL 
SENIORS 



Carlos Cunningham 

Guard 

An aggressive linesman, a bulwark 

on defense, a good player. 

Gordon Garrett 

Tackle 

At blocking punts, rushing passes, 

Gordon is hard to beat. 

Al Brown 

Tackle 
A sturdy, stalwart player, a suc- 
cessful football career. 

Worley Field 
Half 

His running, passing and kicking 
made him a triple threat. 

Harvey Moore 

Quarter 

His signal calling, blocking and 

kicking was very commendable. 



SENIORS c*j) 



BASKETBALL ROSTER 



Chester Macomber 
Irvin Waldrop 
Tom Everetts 
Jim Stewart 
Ellison Cosby 
Russell Garrett 
Gordon Garrett 
Roland Bailey 
Aubrey Gresham 
Dewitt Dunn 
Parsons 



PAGE 76 



mmi 




PAGE 77 



The Entre Nous 





f 



*; 



FOSTER 



GRESHAM 



THE RESUME 



BASKETBALL SCORES 




. . 50 




. . 18 




. . 31 


Y. M. H. A 


. . 40 




. . 33 


Birmingham-Southern 


. . 29 


Howard 


. . 25 


Birmingham-Southern 


. . 29 




. . 21 


Birmingham-Southern 


. . 23 




. . 48 




. . 43 




. . 39 




40 



Howard's 1931 basketball team was, until 
the Dixie Conference tournament, a very ordi- 
nary team. It won some few games and lost 
as many more, always with a narrow margin of 
victory or defeat. However, when this team 
started into the Conference tournament there 
was no stopping it, and the brilliant play of its 
men netted only one point less than was needed 
to win the first Dixie Conference basketball 
championship. 

Basketball started under full power at the 
beginning of the new semester. Howard's home 
schedule was opened with Staple's Pharmacy. 
Staples won the game, and two Howard stu- 
dents playing with that team starred. One of 
these men, Irwin Waldrop, was drafted onto 
the Howard team and played a fine game 
throughout the rest of the year. 

On Howard's second meeting with the Sta- 
ples quintet they emerged victors by a score 



PAGE 78 



The Entre Nous 



of 50-18, with Stidham and Foster playing their 
usual scintillating game. 

Howard's next local game was played against 
the Y. M. H. A. team. This team was the 
defending champion of the city league, and 
again in 1931 ranked as the strongest in the 
league. The Simonizers won 40-31, but, judg- 
ing from pre-game dope, Howard's showing 
was excellent. 

In their next appearance the Bulldog five 
beat Birmingham-Southern in the first game of 
the city championship series by a score of 33-29. 
The game was played on the B. A. C. floor. 

The next game the Panthers came back 
strong to win the victory, 29-25. In the third 



through February 26. In the first round, How- 
ard defeated a weak Spring Hill team by a 
wide margin. "Cherry" Foster led the scoring 
with 18 points. The Bulldog's next opponent, 
Millsaps, was a great favorite to win the tour- 
nament, but in the greatest upset of the series 
Howard came through with a 48-43 in a clos- 
ing dash, eclipsing all other moments of the 
tournament for speed and accuracy of perform- 
ance. Every man who participated in this game 
played inspired basketball, because that was 
what was needed to win. 

As finalists in the first annual conference 
basketball tournament, Howard and Chatta- 
nooga met. The game was opened with a dash 



OF THE SEASON 



encounter, Southern again won by scoring the 
decisive two points in the last minute of the 
game. The score was 23-21. 

In the fourth game the Bulldogs led the 
Panthers until the last six minutes, when the 
Hilltoppers sped into the lead and stayed there. 
Wylie Waller, Southern's scoring ace, was 
guarded so closely in this game by Al Brown 
that he was only able to score three points until 
the second half, when Brown was ejected from 
the game because of fouls. 

The great team-work of "Cherry" Foster and 
Ernest Stidham was a remarkable feature of 
the series. Foster's performance this year has 
been the most brilliant seen in local games, with 
Stidham's running a close second. In the series, 
Foster and Stidham totaled 84 points, or 80 
per cent of Howard's total points. 

The Dixie Conference basketball tournament 
was held at the B. A. C. from February 23 



by the Moccasins, who scored eight points, but 
by the time the half ended Howard was only 
behind by two points and the score stood 19-17. 
With but five minutes left to play, Chatta- 
nooga, with their three-point advantage, began 
to freeze the ball, and Howard was only able 
to make two more points. The game ended 
with Chattanooga winning by a one-point mar- 
gin, 40-39. Stidham and Foster were high 
scorers of the series with 49 and 51 points, 
respectively. 

The Howard players deserve a great amount 
of credit due to the fact that they were able to 
pull out of a very mediocre season into a bril- 
liant finish and close their season with the grati- 
fication of being in second place in the confer- 
ence basketball standing. 

All players were awarded silver basketball 
watch-charms signifying second place in the 
tournament. 



PAGE 79 



BASEBALL ROSTER 



PITCHERS 

Ellis Page Lamar Williams 

Al Brown Dan Snell 

CATCHERS 

Aubrey Gresham 
Dewitt Dunn 
Dan Watkins 

INFIELDERS 

Roland Bailey Hick Ewing 

Roy Fayet E. T. Waldrond 

Cope Graves 

OUTFIELDERS 

Pete Allen 
Sam Jones 
Preston Langston 
Bob Glenn 



PAGE 80 



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TRACK ROSTER 

Tom Everetts ioo, 220 Sciireckenvost — Broad Jump, High 

Chester Macomber — Pole Vault, Low Jump. 

Hurdles, High Hurdles. Charley Hulsey 100, 200 

Ray Holmsted .... Shot, Discus Vernon Brantley . . . Two Mile 

J ww Va.. 00 CHESTER SPATH .... Shot, DiSCUS 

L.EE HALL 880 T t-v . -r, 1 

T „ t it ii „• , ,, ,, Louis Davis 440, Relav 

Joe Hall, Low Hurdles, H.gh Hurdles GoDFREy Glenn . ++0i ReIav> Dbcus 

Duncan . . .One Mile, Two Mile r oland Molpus .... High Jump 

Lower Two Mile David Napier . Pole Vault, High Jump 

Clinkscales .... 880, One Mile Joe Cottrell .... Javelin, Shot 

Bob Clark, Coach 
Mike Wells, Manager 

The completion of the Berry Track Field this year was a 
great help to the sport. There was much splendid material 
available, and with the able coaching of Bob Clark, Howard 
made a very impressive showing in various divisions of track. 
The outstanding men were: Macomber, pole vault at ll 1 /^ 
feet; Duncan, 1 mile in 4 minutes and 45 seconds; Everetts, 
100-yard dash in 9 minutes and 9 seconds, and 220 yards in 
22 seconds. 

In the Fraternity Track Meet, the high point men were: 
Macomber, Alpha Lambda Tau; Everetts, Theta Kappa Nu; 
Duncan and Clinkscales, non-fraternity. Theta Kappa Nu 
won the Fraternity Track Meet. 

As manager of the team Joe Mike Wells did a swell job. 
As coach, Bob Clark was incomparable. He will not be back 
at Howard next year, and his will be a hard place to fill. 
Wherever he may be, we wish him much success and happiness. 

The scores for the season were: 

Alabama 77; Howard 44 

Vanderbilt 84; Howard 34 

Birmingham-Southern . . 49; Howard 77 



PAGE 82 




TOAGK 






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PAGE 83 



Girls 




■ n~LM~- ^ .»■ ,_ 



With Miss Cate's entrance to Howard 
College in 1930, women's varsity teams were 
abandoned and class teams started. At that 
time the Women's Athletic Association was 
formed to put a point system into operation. 

According to the point system any girl 
having fifty points is admitted to the asso- 
ciation. The points are gained by coming 
out for a certain percentage of the prac- 
tices and taking part in interclass games. 
For instance, fifty points are awarded to the 
girls coming out to the required number of 
practices; one hundred points to those mak- 
ing the actual team in a major sport. Seven 
hundred and fifty points are necessary to win 
an H. 

It is the function of the Women's Ath- 
letic Association to regulate the interclass 
and intersorority games. Each fall a party 
is given in honor of the Freshman Class, 
and in the spring a W. A. A. banquet for 
all members, at which letters and loving cups 
to the winning teams are awarded. The as- 
sociation sends two delegates to the conven- 
tion of the National Federation of College 
Women and also sends representatives to the 
annual Alabama State College play day.. 
District Number Five in Alabama holds 
its annual play day at Howard, which is 
sponsored by the Women's Athletic Asso- 
ciation. 

Hockey was first introduced to Howard 
College by Miss Cate the fall of 1930. 
Since then, under her coaching, hockey has 
become dear to the hearts of W. A. A. 
members. This year at the first of October 



PAGE 84 



Athletics 



approximately thirty girls were on the held in their blue suits, and by the end of the 
season twenty-five girls had earned points. The combined Freshman-Junior team won 
the most games in hockey, finally over-r:ding the Sophomore-Senior team by the score 
of 2-0. Players on the 1936-1934 team winning the cup are: Lucile Metts, Mattie 
Howell, Julia Brown, Madrene Rothermel, Mildred Brooks, Arselh Foster, Virginia 
Eagles, Erin Wallace, Mary Graves, Elizabeth Knight, Lillie Mae McLaney, and Grace 
Mangun. 

The girls' interclass basketball teams played many fast and interesting games this 
year. The senior team elected Evie Mae Ansley, '33, as their captain; the juniors chose 
Majel Mangun, '34, as their captain; the sophomores, Theo Bozeman, '35; and the 
freshmen were captained by Louise Nail, '36. 

The freshman team and the sophomore team were the undefeated teams that played 
the championship game. The final game was played fast and snappy. During almost 
the entire game both teams kept a tie score. In the last quarter the score was 14-12, 
but the freshmen raised their score two points to make it a tie again. In the last minute 
of play the sophomores scored another basket, leaving the final score in their favor, 16-14. 
Members of the sophomore team were: Theo Bozeman, Hazel Pawson, Faye New, 
Frances Hankins, Ethel Howie, and Dorothy Wilhite. 

Warm days are here again and it's baseball time at Howard. Seventh inning! Two 
and three . . . what will it be? It's a strike and the freshman-senior team won the 
tournament. The cup was duly presented to the following girls at the W. A. A. 
banquet: Madrena Rothermel, Eloise Miles, Louise Nail, Mattie Howell, Juliet Weeks, 
Ann Berry, Maxine Dupuy, Evie Mae Ansley, Lonnell Smith, and Louise Detamore. 

The popularity of tennis is always shown by the enrollment in the tennis classes. 
Toward the last of the year a tournament was held to determine class teams. Hazel 
Pawson, '35, skilled racqueteer, defeated Glendolvn Cole, '34, for singles championship. 
Ruth Carver and Frances Hankins, both of the Class of '35, were winners of the 
doubles tournament. Now that the girls' court in back of the gymnasium has received 
attention and the court back of Renfroe Hall is available to the girls, there will 1> 
greater chance for participation in this sport. 

Ping-pong. Howard's most popular sport! Long may the balls stand up under the 
slams and bangs, slices and cuts of the expert p : -g-pongists, and three cheers for the 
instructors that hold classes in order that the mc ed students may even get into the 
ping-pong room. Yes, dear reader, 'tis true that ping-pong is considered as modified 
gym, but the waiting line of football players eagerly awaiting their turn would not be 
longer if ice cream were served free with each game. 



PAGE 85 





L 



W. A. A. 

• 

Odell Turner • . . President 

Mildred Brooks Vice-President 

Hazel Pawson Secretary 

Louise Detamore . ..... Treasurer 

Majel Mangum ) _ ... . .. 

V . Publicity Managers 
Dorothy McKinney} 

Theo Bozeman Hockey 

Ruth Carver • Basketball 

Frances Hankins ...... Baseball 

Glendolyn Cole Tennis 

Julia Brown Hiking 

Dorothy Cason Track 



\ 



a 



rqamza 



[zail 



tons 



c 



f ne Jnovinq t/inger 
writes; ana having writ, 
Jfioves on: nor all thy Jriety 

nor\)Yil 
Snail lure it hack to cancel 

naif a bine, 
CHor all iky ^ears wash, 
out a wore of it. 

— Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam. 



The Entre Nous 



'i 

V 

■f 




STUDENT BODY OFFICERS 

Carl Park President 

E. T. Walrond Vice-President 

Lonnell Smith Secretary 

Pauline Wilson Treasurer 

•— O -=* 




PAGE 93 



The Entre Nous 




Cason, Ansley, Maunev, Caudell, Pawson 



STUDENT COUNCIL 

Carl Park President Student Body 

Beulah Caudell ) 

Chapman Meadows v Senior Representatives 

Wilbur Blackman J 

Marjorie MauneyI . „ 

^ „, Y Junior Representatives 

Dorothy Cason 

Paul Cox "1 „ , n 

_, y sophomore Representatives 

Hazel Pawson | 

Evelyn Ansley Freshman Representative 



PAGE 94 






The Entre Nous 







McEachern, Stallworth, Caudell 
Matthews, Smith 



BAPTIST STUDENT UNION 

Dewitt Matthews ■ ■ ■ • President 

Parks Redwine First Vice-President 

Marian' Stallworth Seeo/id lice-President 

Oscar Davis Third Vice-President 

Clara McEacherx Secretary 

Henry Smith Treasurer 

Beulah Caudeli Reporter 

John D. Pope Chorister 

Lonnell Smith Pianist 



Representatives 

Anna Stuart Dupuy President Y. IT. C. A. 

Robert Ansley President Y. M. C. .1. 

Leon Macon President Ministerial Association 

Owen Williams General Sunday School Representative 

Eunice Long (A. C.) 

Ruth Wooley (Lambdin) 

Ava Robinson (Neal) 

Ann Berry (Waddell) 

Estha Mae Irwin Student Secretary 



Presidents of College B. Y. P. U.'s 



PAGE 95 



The Entre Nous 








OUTLAXD, MaL'NEV 






\* 



THE BULL PUP 



Marjorie Mauney . . . . 
Alvin Outland . . 



Edit<, 



Business Manager 



The "Bull Pup" is the freshman handbook published each 
September and presented to the students. The editor and 
business manager are elected in the fall by the student 

body. 



FAGE 96 



V 

\ 



The Entre Nous 







Goff, Smith 



THE ENTRE NOUS 

Lee Price Goff Editor-in-Chief 

Bess McComas Assistant Editor 

Henry Smith, Jr . Business Manager 

Frank Flemming Assistant Business Manager 

Features 
Melvin Bentley Ed Mason Louise Harrison Marjorie Maunev 

Classes 

Senior Sophomore Junior Fresh/nan 

Nina Miglionico Evelyn C. Johnsou Beulah Caudei.l Mildred Wilkinson 

Louise Harrison Walter Harper Ernest Smith Henry Parker 

Organizations 



Mada Berry 



Robert Ansley 



Sports Editors 
Stanley Mate Majel Mangum 

Art Editors 

Katherinf. U pshaw Robert Darden 

Amasa Windham 



PAGE 97 



The Entre Nous 



■51 © dj 



Stallworth, Micliomco, Smith 



HYPATIA 

Officers 

Marian Stallworth President 

Nina Micliomco Vice-President 

Mary Claire Randall Secretary-Treasurer 

Annie Mae Crumpton Chaplain 

Lonnell Smith Monitor 

Mary Elizabeth Gray Historian 



\ 



\ 



PAGE 98 



\ 
\ 



The Entre Nous 



y 




Gauggel, Stroud, Almgren, Reiger 

ALPHA EPSILON DELTA 

(Pre-Medical Fraternity) 

Founded at the University of Alabama in 1926 
Five Active Chapters Colors: Red and White 

ALPHA BETA CHAPTER 
Fratres in Facultate 

Dr. J. L. Brakefield Dr. John R. Sampey 

Officers 

Edgar Almcreen President 

William Stroud Vice-President 

Albon Head Secretary 

George Gauggle Treasurer 



Fratres in Collegio 
Clyde Wilson 

Pledges 

Neal Lavender Harry Stratford 

Martin Aiken Irwin E. Hardy 

Lawrence McNeil Sydney Rieger 

Julian Ragan George McCrory 



PAGE 99 



The Entre Nous 




Top: Smith, Fuller, McEacherx, Caudell 
Bottom: Smith, Galloway, Stallworth. 



s 



WOMEN'S DORMITORY COUNCIL 

Lucile Smith President 

Frances Fuller Vice-President 

Clara McEacherk Secretary 

Beulah Caudell Senior Representative 

Ruth Powell Junior Representative 

Lonnell Smith . Left Wing President 

Marian Stallworth Right Wing President 

Dot Galloway Treasurer 



\ 



PAGE 100 



\ 

\ 
\ 



The Entre Nous 



y 




Caudell, Lamb, Harrison* 
Mangun, Goff 



DELTA KAPPA 

(Honorary Debating Fraternity) 

Officers 

Louise Harrison President 

Beulah Caudell Vice-President 

Majel Mangum Secretary 

Coleman Lamb Treasurer 

Lee Price Goff Publicity Chairman 



Evelyn Ansley 
Ann Berry 
Mada Berry 
Ortho Bruce 
Ruth Carver 
Beulah Caudell 
Alan Cook 



Members 

Ernest Dunlap 
Lee Price Goff 
Wilbur Graves 
Coleman Lamb 
Majel Mangum 
Robert Marsh 
John Miglionico 
Harvey Moore 



Henry Parker 
Julia Reeves 
John Rogers 
Jack Robertson 
Ewell Sexton 
Claude Smith 
Kathrine Upshaw 



Faculty Advisors 
Vernon L. Mangum Louis W. Lohr 



PAGE 101 



The Entre Nous 







MINISTERIAL ASSOCIATION 



Leon Macon President 

Oscar Davis Vice-President 

J. D. Tolleson Secretary 

Marvin Gardner Treasurer 



Vernon Brantley Reporter 

Robert Perry Chorister 

Charles Pierson Pianist 

Parks Redwine . . Pulpit Supply Committee 



Members 



loftin abrams 
Preston Acker 
John Barnes 
Robert Bamburc 
Dolphus Barnett 
Vernon Brantley 
Elmon Brown 
G. H. Carroll 
Clarence Clinkscales 
Gasten Daniels 
Oscar A. Davis 
H. E. Durden 
Raymond Dykes 
Homer Falkner 
Marvin Gardner 
Charles Granade 
Lawrence Greer 
Allen Hyatt 



John Isom 
Osmar Jacobs 
John Johnson 
Oliver Johnson 
Kelley Johnson 
Julius Avery 
Howard Bryant 
Judson Jones 
Malcolm Kennedy 
Oley Kidd 
Coleman Lamb 
Robert Lankford 
J. K. Lawton 
Barnett Larrimore 
Roby Lee 
Mark Lower 
Ralph Lyerly' 



Richard Lyon- 
Leon Macon 
Robert Marsh 
Gaines Mason 
Dewitt Matthews 
R. E. Merrill 
Paul Minton 
G. T. Mosley 
Paul O'Neal 
Henry A. Parker 
E. N. Patterson 
R. B. Peace 
Fred Pennington 
Robert Perry 
C. B. Phillips 
Charles Pierson 
J. D. Pope 



Parks Redwine 
John Rasco 
French Rhodes 
James Robison 
Raymon Schneider 
Karl Seepe 
Ewell Sexton 
Nathan Sims 
Henry Sisson 
J. A. Smallwood 
Dale Stanford 
George Tidwell 
J. D. Tolleson 
W. C. West 
Clayton Waddell 
Cecil Ward 
Grady Winstead 



PAGE 102 






The Entre Nous 



■i 




BOOK LOVERS' CLUB 

Officers 

Louise Harrison President 

Louise Tippen Vice-President 

Mary Algee Secretary 

Nina Miglionico Treasurer 

Elizabeth Kronenberg ..... Publicity Manager 
Mada Berry Reporter 



Elaine Aaron 
Mary Algee 
Sarah Alred 
Lucile Band 
Mada Berry 
Ann Berry 
Aileen Carlton 
Miss Annie Boyett 
Annie Mae Crumpton 
Nell Clifton 
Ansella Foster 
Pauline Gilliland 



Members 

Margaret Hairston 
Louise Harrison 
Katie Lou Hammet 
Angeline Howell 
Mattie Howell 
Eva Hargrave 
Hazel Hurtt 
Emma Lee Johnson 
Annie Jones 
Elizabeth Kronenberg 
Dinnie Mae Mackey 
Florence Mae McCoy 
Kate Malone 



Nina Miglionico 
Dorothy McKinney 
Eunie Parker 
Hughie Peerson 
Mary Elizabeth Rhodes 
Edith Smith 
Edna Stewart 
Josephine T. Davis 
Louise Tippen 
Juliet Weeks 
Ellastein Wright 
Caroline Willis 



PAGE 103 



The Entre Nous 



^43EilisE 




S 

S 

s 

V 



BETA PI THETA 

(National Honorary French Fraternity) 

THETA NU CHAPTER 
Established in 1926 

Colors: Royal Purple, Gold and White Flower: Fleur-de-Lis 

Officers 

Lillian Cunningham President 

Mildred Brooks Vice-President 

Catherine Williams Secretary 

Elaine Aaron Treasurer 

Members 

Elaine Aaron Lee Price Goff 

Robert Ansley Mabel Hudson 

Mada Berry Elizabeth Kronenberg 

Theo Bozeman Marjorie Manuey 

Mildred Brooks Dixie Patten 

Glendolyn Cole George Tidwell 

Lillian Cunningham Irving Weinstein 
Catherine Williams 



PAGE 104 



\ 
\ 
\ 
\ 



The Entre Nous 







GIRLS' GLEE CLUB 

Mrs. W. A. Counts Director 

Lonnell Smith President 

Nina Miglionico Accompanist 



Personnel 



Kate Maloxe 
Betty Dickinson- 
Annie Mae Crumpton 
Emma Lee Johnson 
Louise Tippen 
Edna Stewart 
Eunice Long 
Fay New 
Lonnell Smith 
Gussie Herfner 



Meta LaTwille 
Jean Hearn 
Mary Elizabeth Rhodes 
Elizabeth Urquart 
Jewel Holly 
Kathleen Cruller 
Julia Brown 
Mildred Godwin 
Margaret Godwin 
Mary Jo Slaughter 



PAGE 105 



The Entre Nous 









"-' y «r 1^ 

ft * A "ST 

Mauney, Wilkinson, Eagles, Mancun, Cunningham 

Berry, Cason, Allred, Johnson 

Harrison, Smith, Munsell, Goff, Dupuy 

Y. W. C. A. 

Officers 

Anna Stuart Dupuy President Lee Price Goff Secretary 

Marjorie Mauney .... Vice-President Mada Berry Treasurer 

Louise Harrison . Freshman Commission Dir. 

Cabinet 

, . ■ , n -, 4 \ Mary Algee , r , ,, ru ,-. n ,, S Dorothy Cason 

Interracial Committee . . j DoROTHY BuRKE W ortd Fellowship Commute j §ARAH Alreq 

c ;c ■ r ■„ S Lonnell Smith Bulletin Board Comm { Mary Cla1re Randall 

Social Service Committee . j Ruth Carver Bulletin noma comm j j£AN Hearn 

„ • Ir .„ { Lillian Cunningham Reporter Evie Mae Ansley 

social committee . • | Virginia Eagles Devotional Committee . Evelyn C. Johnson 

| Mary Elizabeth Gray Pres. Fresh. Commission . Margaret Lanford 

industrial Committee j Catherine Munsell Vice-Pres. Fresh. Com. . Mildred Wilkinson 

Sec.-Treas. Fresh. Com. . . Grace Mangum 



PAGE 106 



\ 

\ 
\ 



The Entre Nous 



'i 








Ansley, Bruce, Garner, Douglas, King 
Parker, Kennedy, Peace, Outlande 

Y. M. C. A. 

Officers 

Robert Ansley President 

Ellison Cosby Vice-President 

John Milford Secretary-Treasurer 

Cabinet Members 

Ed Mason Chapman Meadows Ellison Cosby 

J. B. King Jack Robertson John J. Milford, Jr. 

Alvin Outlande Clayton Waddell R. B. Peace 

E. N. Patterson J. Vernon Brantley Lamar Kennedy 

Tom Garner Dave Curry Ward Upton 

Henry Smith Judson Jones Jess Weldon 

Henry Parker Don Mosher Aubrey Gresham 

Julian Ragan Paul Tarrant Bob Glenn 

Jerry Fenn Barnett Wiggins Tom Adams 

John R. Fenn Otho Bruce Tom Clinkscales 

Tom Douglas J. C. Tolleson Marvin Gardner 

James Haley Bradford Wood Robert Marsh 



PAGE 1 07 



t 




t 



raterriLtLes 



\tl 




for in and out, above, 

about, below, 
C- is notkina but a Jnaqic 

Skaoow-skow, 
Jrlau a in a Jjox whose 

Cianale is the Sun, 
JSjDuno wkick we Jrkantom 

^figures come ana cjo. 

— Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam, 



The Entre Nous 







McCurdy, Freeman, Fayet, Kennedy 
Almgren, Park, Randolph, Waldrond 



MEN'S PAN-HELLENIC COUNCIL 

Officers 

Jake Freeman President 

Carl Park Vice-President 

Victor Randolph Secretary-Treasurer 

Representatives 

Pi Kappa Alpha Sigma Nu 

Roy Fayet J. N. Brown 

E. T. Waldrond John Milford 

Pi Kappa Phi Theta Kappa Nu 

Carl Park Victor Randolph 

Edgar Almgren Lamar Kennedy 

Alpha Lambda Tau Sigma Phi Epsilon 

Al Brown Phillip McCurdy 

Preston Langston Ward Upton 



PAGE 113 



P ! 



KAPPA 



ALPHA 



Founded at University of Virginia, March 1, 1868 

Colors: Garnet and Old Gold Flower: Lily-of-the-Valley 

Publication: "Shield and Diamond'' 



Jake Freeman 



ALPHA PI CHAPTER 

Established in ion 

Fratres in Collegio 

Class of 1933 

. Birmingham, Ala. Richard Lyon . 

Tom Smith Birmingham, Al 



Birmingham, Ala. 



Class of 1934 



Roy Fayet . . 
Frank Hicks . 
Jack Meacham 



. . . Ensley, Ala. 
. Birmingham, Ala. 
. Birmingham, Ala. 
Barnett Wiccins . 



Alvin Outland . 
E. T. Wai.drond . 
Joe Mike Wells , 
. Birmingham, Ala. 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
. Andalusia, Ala. 



Howard Abrams 
Walter Harper 



Marvin Bishop . 
Douclas Cary . . 
Tom Garner . . 
Woodrow Harris 



Class of 1935 

. . Ohatchee, Ala. Fred Phillips Birmingham, Ala. 

. Birmingham, Ala. Dan Watkins .... Birmingham, Ala. 

Class of 1936 

. Birmingham, Ala. W. J. Isaacs Birmingham, Ala. 

. Birmingham, Ala. A. M. Reid ...... Birmingham, Ala. 

. Birmingham, Ala. James Thompson .... Birmingham, Ala. 

. Birmingham, Ala. Robert Thompson . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

Henry Walters .... Birmingham, Ala. 



PAGE 114 




Abrams, Lyon, Fayet, Harper, Phillips 
Wells, Walrond, Outland, Freeman 







PI KAPPA ALPHA 



ALPHA PI CHAPTER 



PAGE 115 



M 



N U 



Founded at Virginia Military Institute, January 1, 1869 



Colors: Gold, Black, and White 



Publication: "The Delta' 



IOTA CHAPTER 
Established in i8yg 



Flower: White Rose 



Class of 1933 



Robert Ansley . 
Wilbur Blackmon 
J. N. Brown . . 



Birmingham, Ala. 
. . Opelika, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Herbert Eubank . 
Worley Field . . 
William Harrell 



. . Ensley, Ala. 

. . Ensley, Ala. 

. Thomaston, Ala. 



Class of 1934 

Tom Douglas Birmingham, Ala. 

Ed. Mason .... Columbus Grove, Ohio 
Amasa Windham . . . Birmingham, Ala. 
Winston Legg Athens, Ala. 

Class of 1935 

John Milford Huntsville, Ala. 

Robert Hall Birmingham, Ala. 



Class of 1936 



Ortho Bruce . 
David Curry . 
Don Cargill . 
Campbell Kidd 
Joe Wurtele . 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
. . Ensley, Ala. 



Muir Edney . . . 
Carmel Snow . . . 
Russell Cunningham 
J. B. King .... 
Thomas Floyd . . . 



Birmingham, Ala. 
. Helena, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



PAGE 116 




Floyd, Legge, Bentley, Kincaid, Wurtele 

Wittmeir, Mason, Kidd, Ansley, King 
Brown, Blackmon, Bruce, Harrell, Eubank 




SIGMA NU 

IOTA CHAPTER 



PAGE 117 



p I 



KAPPA 



P H I 



Founded at the College of Charleston, December, 1904 



Colors: Gold and White 



Publication: "The Star and Lamp" 



ALPHA ETA CHAPTER 

Established 192$ 



Floicer: Red Rose 



Fratres in Collegio 

Class of 1933 

Edgar Almgren Fairfield, Ala. Whitmel Cobb . 

Collier Crow Decatur, Ala. Frank Fleming . . 

Howard Perdue .... Birmingham, Ala. 



Birmingham, Ala. 
. . Luverne, Ala. 



Class of 1934 



J. B. Gwin Bessemer, Ala. 

Paul Gwin . Summit, Ala. 

Joe Hall Swaim, Ala. 

Lee Hall Swaim, Ala. 

Henry Smith . . . 



Everett Ingram . 
Maness Kirkland 
Sam Jones . . . 
Amos Smallwood 
Alexandria City, Ala. 



. . Ashland, Ala. 

. Waycross, Ga. 

. Pine Apple, Ala. 

Birmingham, Ala. 



Class of 1935 

Robert Allen .... Birmingham, Ala. Copeland Graves . . 

Howell Bennett Dothan, Ala. Julian Ragan . . . 

Paul Cox Clanton, Ala. Thomas McWhirter . 

Class of 1936 

James Edwards Mobile, Ala. Henry Allen Parker 

Robert McCarty Dothan, Ala. Clayton Salter . 

Ross Peoples Birmingham, Ala. Claude Smith . . . 



. Blountsville, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



. . Mobile, Ala. 
. Georgiana, Ala. 
. . Mentone, Ala. 



PAGE 118 



^> ^> i& 4> 



Cox, Cobb, McCarty, Parker 

Graves, Smith, Jones 

Edwards, Park, Almgrek, Crow 




PI KAPPA PHI 



ALPHA ETA CHAPTER 



PAGE 119 



T H E T A 



KAPPA 



N U 



Organized 1919, Nationalized 1924 

Colors: Silver, Black and Crimson 

Publication: "Theta Kappa Nu News" 



Floiver: White Rose 



ALABAMA ALPHA CHAPTER 

Established in 1924. 



Carlos Cunningham 
Wilbur Graves . 
Ellis Paige . . . . 



Fratres in Collegio 

Class of 1933 

. . . Kansas, Ala. Victor Randolph . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

. Collinsville, Ala. Earl Rudolph Birmingham, Ala. 

Tarrant City, Ala. Ed Sweeney ..... Birmingham, Ala. 



Hickman Ewing 
Jeremiah Fenn . 
Charlie Hulsey 



Class of 1934 



. Memphis, Term. 

Birmingham, Ala. 

. . Guin, Ala. 



Lamar Kennedy 
Herbert Lykes . 
Mayo Manasco . 



. Brundidge, Ala. 

Birmingham, Ala. 

. Townley, Ala. 



Robert Marsh 



Class of 1935 
Dothan, Ala. Aubrey Sanders 



Parrish, Ala. 



Class of 1936 



Pete Allen Birmingham, Ala. 

Truman Bass Birmingham, Ala. 

Leo Brazil Millport, Ala. 

John Fenn Birmingham, Ala. 

Ewin Harbin Edgewood, Ala. 

Gus Mackey Birmingham, Ala. 



Roland Molphus 
Russell Molphus 
Freddie Morris . . 
Roy Myrick . . 
E. P. Poe . . . 
Hamner Hildreth 



. . Mobile, Ala. 

. . Mobile, Ala. 
Brownsville, Tenn. 

. Sylacauga, Ala. 
. Birmingham, Ala. 

. Enterprise, Ala. 



PAGE 120 




Kennedy, Hulsey, Randolph, Sweeney, Kimbrough 
Smith, Graves, Fenn, Myrick, Sanders 




THETA KAPPA NU 



ALABAMA ALPHA CHAPTER 



PAGE 121 



SIGMA- PHI • EPSILON 



Founded at University of Richmond, 1901 



Colors: Purple and Red 



Floiver: Red Rose 



Publication: ''Sig Ep Journal" 



ALPHA GAMMA CHAPTER 

Established in 1930 

Fratres in Collegio 

Class of 1933 

Ward Upton Wylam, Ala. 

Robert Darden Birmingham, Ala. 

Class of 1934 

Larry Larrimore Dickinson, Ala. 

Joe Cottrell Decatur, Ala. 

Inzer Reid Montevallo, Ala. 

Class of 1935 

Phillip McCurdy Birmingham, Ala. 

Jack Osburn Lewistown, Mont. 

James Turnfr . . Pell City, Ala. 

Class of 1936 

Nash Reader Bessemer, Ala. 

Archie Freeman Birmingham, Ala. 

Paul Freeman Birmingham, Ala. 

David Kilpatrick Erie, Pa. 

Chet Spath Erie, Pa. 

Jesse Weldon Wilsonville, Ala. 

Murel Schreckenvost Erie, Pa. 



PAGE 122 




Turner, McCurdy, Larrimore, Ingram 




SIGMA PHI EPSILON 



ALPHA GAMMA CHAPTER 



PAGE 123 



The Entre Nous 







Top Roiv: Mangun, Cunningham, Dupuy, Munsell, Goff 
Bottom Row: Caudell, Williams, Stallworth, Johnson, McEachern. 



WOMEN'S PAN-HELLENIC COUNCIL 

Officers 

Anna Stuart Dupuy President 

Catherine Munsell Vice-President 

Evelyn C. Johnson Secretary 

Lillian Cunningham Treasurer 

Representatives 
Alpha Deta Pi 1 Marv Elizabeth Gray 

)jUNE SHARPLES 

Alpha Delta Theta (Marian Stalworih 

)Beulah Caudell 

Beta Phi Alpha \ Lee Price Goff 

| Lillian Cunningham 

Delta Zeta (Majel Mangum 

)Mary Claire Randall 

Pl tl Mu (Catherine Munsell 

J Clara McEachern 

Sigma lota Chi [Evelyn C. Johnson 

Mennie Williams 



PAGE 125 



ALPHA 



DELTA 



P I 



Colors: Blue and White 



Founded at Wesley an College in 1851 



Publication: Adelphian 



Flower: Violet 



KAPPA CHAPTER 

Founded in ioio 

Class of 1933 

Evie Mae Ansley . . . Birmingham, Ala. Helen Moreland . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

Frances Fuller Perryville, Ala. Maidee Miles Oneonta, Ala. 

Mary Elizabeth Gray . Birmingham, Ala. Sara Hobbs Birmingham, Ala. 



Mary Algee . . . 
Ruth Powell . . . 
June Sharples . . . 
Jean Battle Walker 



Class of 1934 

Birmingham, Ala. Gail Roberts Albertville, Ala. 

. Andalusia, Ala. Mary Elizabeth Stamper, Birmingham, Ala. 

Birmingham, Ala. Mary Anderson .... Thomasville, Ala. 

Birmingham, Ala. Josephine High Ashville, Ala. 



Mary Barnhart 
Aileen Carlton . 
Hardee Martin . 
Eunie Parker . . 



Class of 1935 

Birmingham, Ala. Sue Neal Birmingham, Ala. 

Birmingham, Ala. Edith Smith Birmingham, Ala. 

Birmingham, Ala. Evelyn Manker El Paso, Texas 

■ Birmingham, Ala. Martha Brasfield Dora, Ala. 



Gladys Alldridge 
Edith Cowan . . 
Velma Neal . . 
Marjorie Smith . 
Margaret Jones . 



Class of 1936 

Brookfield, Ala. Elaine Young 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Madrene Rothermel 
Elizabeth Weakley 
Virginia White . . 
Eloise Miles . . . 



. Birmingham, Ala. 

. Birmingham, Ala. 

. Birmingham, Ala. 

. Birmingham, Ala. 

. . Oneonta, Ala. 



PAGE 126 









Weakley, Anderson, Carlton 
Fuller, Algee, Gray 





ALPHA DELTA PI 



KAPPA CHAPTER 



i I 



PAGE 127 



H 



M 



U 



Founded at Wesleyan College in 1852 

Colors: Rose and White Floivrr: Enchantress Carnation 

Publication: "The Aglaia" 



Ruth Manley 



ALPHA GAMMA CHAPTER 

Established in 1924. 

Class of 1933 

Birmingham, Ala. Catherine Munsell 



Pauline Wilson . 



. Birmingham, Ala. 



Birmingham, Ala. 



Class of 1934 

Elizabeth Brown . . . Birmingham, Ala. 



Doris Bridges . . 
Evelyn Grimmer 
Bess McComas . 



Class of 1935 

. Birmingham, Ala. Clara McEachern .... Louisville, Ala. 
. Birmingham, Ala. Marjorie Roper .... Birmingham, Ala. 
. Birmingham, Ala. Evelyn Suddeih .... Birmingham, Ala. 
Rera Wear Birmingham, Ala. 



Class of 1936 



Evelyn Ansley . . 
Marjorie Derby . . 
Evalyn Looney . . 
Elizabeth McNeil . 
Katie Lou Hammett 
Dorothy Walker . 
Meta La Tuille . . 
Margaret Hogan . 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



PAGE 128 









Maxley, Muxsell, Grimmer, McComas 

McEacherx, Roper, Suddeth, Wear 

Axslev, Hogax, Looxev, Walker 




PHI MU 

ALPHA GAMMA CHAPTER 



PAGE 129 



DELTA 



Z E T A 



Founded at Miami University, 1902 



Colors: Rose and Green Flower: Killarney Rose 

Publication: ''The Lamp" 



ALPHA PI CHAPTER 

Established in IQ2I 



Odell Turner . . . 
Mary Claire Randle . 



Class of 1933 



. Birmingham, Ala. 
. Birmingham, Ala. 



Maxine Dupuy . . 
Anna Stuart Dupuy 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Class of 1934 



Majel Mangum . 
Dorothy Cason . 
Glendolyn Cole . 
Marjorie Mauney 



. Birmingham, Ala. 
. Birmingham, Ala. 
. Birmingham, Ala. 
. Birmingham, Ala. 
Octavia Martin . 



Mary Nunnelly . 
Elizabeth Stockard 
Kathryn Davis . . 
Mildred Maxwell . 
. Birmingham, Ala. 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Virginia Eagles 
Idell Turner . 
Leonte Saye . 



Class of 1935 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Ethel Howle . 
Ruth Carver . 
Hazel Pawson 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Mildred Godwin . 
Margaret Godwin 
Frances Kinne . 
Newell Bryan . . 



Class of 1936 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
. Nashville, Tenn. 



Elizabeth Hoover 
Helen Malone . 
Varina Shelton . 
Grace Mangun . 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



PAGE 130 




Godwin, Godwin, Etheridce, Eagles, Mauney, Hoover, Pawson 

Maxwell, G. Mangun, Shelton, A. S. Dupuy, M. Dupuy, Turner, Saye 

Cason, Bryan, Carver, Nunnelley, Galloway, M. Mangun, Kinne 




DELTA ZETA 



ALPHA PI CHAPTER 



PAGE 131 



BETA • SIGMA • OMICRON 



Colors: Rubv and Red 



Founded at University of Missouri, 1888 



Publication: "The Urn" 



Flower: Killarnev Rose 



BETA BETA CHAPTER 

Established in /QJJ 



Class of 1933 

Thelma Duke Birmingham, Ala. 

Leila Mae Griffith Birmingham, Ala. 

Mildred Guest Fort Payne, Ala. 

Mary Burl Reedy . Birmingham, Ala. 

Anna Will Richardson Fort Payne, Ala. 

Leonora Vice Birmingham, Ala. 

Class of 1935 

Elizabeth Bobo Birmingham, Ala. 

Isabeli.e Davies Birmingham, Ala. 

Evelyn Calhoun Johnson Birmingham, Ala. 

Class of 1936 

Lurlene Orr Birmingham, Ala. 

Ellen Mae Perry- Birmingham, Ala. 

Virginia Logan Fairfield, Ala. 

Mary Jo Slaughter Birmingham, Ala. 



PAGE 132 




Perry, Johnson, Davies, Bobo, Reedy 
Vice, Griffith, Richardson, Guest, Slaughter 




BETA SIGMA OMICRON 



BETA BETA CHAPTER 



PAGE 133 



BETA • PHI • ALPHA 



Founded at University of California in 1907 



Colors: Green and Gold 



Publication: "Aldebaran" 



SIGMA CHAPTER 

Established in 192S 



Flower: Tea Rose 



I illian Cunningham 
Lee Price Goff . . . 
Dinnie Mae Mackey 



Class of 1933 



. Birmingham, Ala. 
. Cleveland, Ohio 
. Birmingham, Ala. 
Annie Ruth Wynn 



Hughie Peerson . 
Mary Jo Phillips . 
Catherine Williams 
. Birmingham, Ala. 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Louise Detamore . 



Class of 1934 



. Birmingham, Ala. 
Katherine Upshaw 



Dixie Patten . . 
. Birmingham, Ala. 



Birmingham, Ala. 



Theo Bozeman . 
Frances Carlton 



Class of 1935 

. Birmingham, Ala. Margie Belle Craig 



. Birmingham, Ala. 
Virginia Glaze . 



Jeanette Murphree 
. Birmingham, Ala. 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Fredella Carter . 
Katherine Franks 
Lucile Metts . . 



Class of 1936 



. Birmingham, Ala. 
. Birmingham, Ala. 
. Birmingham, Ala. 
Isabel Wilson . . 



Lucile Raiford . . 
Dorothy Wilder . 
Mildred Wilkinson 
. Birmingham, Ala. 



Birmingham, Ala. 
. . Huffman, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



PAGE 134 




Cunningham, Goff, Mackey, Phillips, Wynn 

Williams, Patten, Detamore, Upshaw, Carlton 

Glaze, Metts, Raiford, Wilder, Wilkinson 




BETA PHI ALPHA 



SIGMA CHAPTER 



PAGE 135 



ALPHA • DELTA • 

Founded at Transylvania College in 1919 

Colors: Turquoise, Silver and Scarlet 

Publication: "The Portals" 

PI CHAPTER 

Established in IQ2Q 

Class of 1933 

Beulah Caudell Falkville, Ala. Lonnell Smith . 

Louise Harrison .... Birmingham, Ala. Lucile Smith . . . 

Jean Hearn Birmingham, Ala. Marian Stallworth 

Class of 1934 

Mada Berry Birmingham, Ala. Hazel Johnson . . 

Dorothy Parker ..... Meridian, Miss. 

Class of 1935 

Virginia Cobb Birmingham, Ala. Mildred Rhodes . . 

Margaret Hearn . . . Birmingham, Ala. Dorothy Stamps . . 

Class of 1936 

Ann Elizabeth Berry . . Birmingham, Ala. Pauline Gilliland . 

Greta Belle Burroughs . Birmingham, Ala. Ava Robinson . 

Special Graduate Student 

Mary Elizabeth Rhodes, Birmingham, Ala. 



THETA 



Flo-zuer: Sweet Pea 



Cottonwood, Ala. 
Cottonwood, Ala. 
. . Beatrice, Ala. 



Birmingham, Ala. 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



. . Centre, Ala. 
Haleyville, Ala. 



PAGE 136 



Lzk {?$ ^ O ^| 









K J 7 ^> *] -^ 



Caudell, Lucile Smith, Lonnell Smith, Berry, Stallworth 
Johnson, Harrison, Stewart, Berry 



ALPHA DELTA THETA 

PI CHAPTER 



PAGE 137 






V 



^Jeat 



eatures 



r4 

^- // I no this D know, wheth- 
er the one X^rue Azlqht 

JKlnote to Ipove, or ( oorath 
consume me quite, 

(Jne SJlasn of Qt within the 
X^avern cauqht 

Jjetter titan In the X^emple 
Lost outrlqht. 

— Rubdiydt of Omar Khayyam. 



I 






I 



KD 



HOWARD 
BEAUTIES 



<jtazet Johnson 





A 





J-ean Jjattle \ Walker 



Jylavrene JVotkermet 




\ 




A 





be'da Jnai] Lfriffi 




JJoris JjYwcjes 




K 






Ljiaoijs GjLorLoqe 



J\cdi] boa <Jiawimeii 






he 1933 Sntre ^ous beauties 
were selected in person at a recep- 
tion at Smith Hall. The judges 
were: Miss Carrie Hill, artist; Wal- 
ter Rosser, photographer; Max Hell- 
man, artist; Ernest Henderson, Jr., 
artist; and Sloan Williams, artist. 
From the entire group of photo- 
graphs the leading beauty was se- 
lected by McClelland Barclay, na- 
tionally known artist and scidptor. 




a 






i 



HESE PAGES PRESENT ONE BEAUTY EACH TROM 
SEVEN OF ALABAMA'S COLLEGES. THESE YOUNG 
LADIES REPRESENT EITHER THE BEAUTY SECTION 
LEADER OF HER RESPECTIVE SCHOOL, OR A REPRE- 
SENTATIVE CHOSEN PARTICULARLY FOR THIS STATE 
WIDE EXCHANGE. WE, THE EDITORS, IN ALL PAR- 
^^^^ TICIPATING SCHOOLS, PRESENT 

FOR YOUR APPROVAL SEVEN 
OF THE SOUTH'S MOST 
BEAUTIFUL GENTLEWOMEN 




^Miss Ojlauama 
Lsollecje 

MISS MARY KATE TROUP 



JHu* Ofc 



JHiss JjlrmLncjkam Southern 

MISS JOSEPHINE BAILEY 



omam K^ouecje 

MISS CAROLYN JENNINGS 




Jnisi Uloward 

MISS HAZEL JOHNSON 



JMlss Ojubarn 

MISS EVELYN CLEMENTS 




Hall of Infamu 



PAGE 155 



The Entre Nous 



HALL OF INFAMY 

We nominate the following to our first Howard College Hall 
of Infamy. Think of that, boys and girls, charter members! 



Reba Wear, for her courage in continuing to hang around 
Carl Park, even though he's not President of ye old Student Body 
any more. But there's another side to that too — maybe she's 
afraid to leave him. 

i i i 

The whole Sigma Nu and A. D. Pi fraternities, for their 
ability to gather a body of sixty-five voters to themselves in the 
Who's Who election last winter. The old "Solid South" was 
great, but the "Solid Snakes" are greater. Then, they deserve 
recognition for the trouble some of them took to write alike. 
They learned well, though, because some twenty ballots had the 
same handwriting. Nice going, Snakes, but we still want to see 
the "Solid Sixty-Five." 

i i i 

Dr. Augustus "Hannibal" Mason, for being so utterly charm- 
ing at times and still being able to fly into a beautiful Shake- 
spearean rage at any time. Maybe he learned that in the Army. 



And then, from the ridiculous to the sublime — Alpha Delta 
Theta Sorority, the "Praying Sistren," for their ability to stand 
up under Dennis Connif's frequent visits. 



Newell Bryan, the "Sweetheart of Pi Kappa Phi," for being 
able to snoot some boys everywhere but at a dance. Nice, though, 
about the Pi Kappa Phis taking you, wasn't it, Newell, but re- 
member, they just had to have somebody. 



PAGE 156 



•/ 



The Entre Nous 



HALL OF INFAMY 

Lee Goff, for being able to get from her house to school and 
back in two hours and a half. "Vas you dere, Charlie?" 



Marguerite Romeo, for thinking she's "it". Wonder why 
there's always a bunch of football players hangin' around? 
Answer? Oh, that's the reason she's in this collection. 



Lil Cunningham, for sporting that Lambda Chi pin around. 
She said she had to get the boy drunk to get it, but a Cunningham 
always gets her man. Ssssssnake! 



Lurlene Orr and her campaign manager, Loee Salter, for 
figuring some means of hanging onto a football player and a 
class president at the same time. Pretty good haul for a begin- 
ner, — or maybe she's kept something from us all this time. 



The S. P. E. Fraternity for continuing to have a chapter when 
they have no furniture. Yeah, the Airport Grill and Highland 
Park Country Club reclaimed all their stuff last year, and when 
they got through there wasn't anything left. 



Miss Annie L. Boyett, for being able to say "delicious" more 
times in a given period than any other person alive. (A record.) 



PAGE 157 



The Entre Nous 



HALL OF INFAMY 

Dixie "Jean Harlow" Patten, for being the only girl on the 
campus to wear her summer hair all winter (two-tone, y'know) . 
Oh, yeah, she went to the University of Chattanooga once, too. 
What? You didn't know? Why, I thought everybody knew that. 



Madrene Rothermel, for being able to look warm and be cold. 
Get the idea? Warm eyes, cold shoulder — it's an old Hilltop 
custom. Easily developed, this habit, but awkward as anything 
when the user decides to break down and make some friends. 



Graham Cox, for looking like "Little Hercules" when he has 
a coat on. What if there was no cotton or wool to build up those 
coat shoulders? — or, if Graham's feet weren't heavy enough to 
hold him down? He'd have to anchor himself to keep from being 
blown away. 

i i i 

Al Brown, for being "Apollo." You needn't puff up, Al, 
you didn't have a thing to do with the color of your hair or the 
fact that there's a wave in it. 



Eunie Parker, for speaking to fewer people on the campus 
than any other co-ed. She must have power, though, because 
she always gets a rush at the dances — if there are any Snakes 
present. 

i i i 

All the Delta Zetas, for getting such a grand bunch of 
pledges last fall. Did you notice how popular they were at first? 
Wonder what happened after that? 



PAGE 158 



The Entre Nous 



> 



HALL OF INFAMY 

Eloise McLaurine, for becoming the new First Lady of 
Howard, and Lamar Kennedy, for feeling flushed enough to give 
her that lovely "Sweetheart" pin. Somebody should write a "Pri- 
vate Life of She Who Wears a Sweetheart Pin." Might be in- 
teresting, don'tcha think? 



Henry Allen Parker, for so effectively veiling the "great open 
spaces" with those "perfectly delicious" dark eyes. Don't you 
just love him? Lots of these High School "Nine Day Wonders" 
last just about as long as it takes to wonder how they got that 
way. Watcha say, Hank? 



Aileen Carlton, for taking Frank Flemming for a ride. How 
did Frank get the idea that he could make any headway with an 
A. D. Pi, and especially the one that, according to the "Solid 
Snakes," was the prettiest female on the campus? Tut, tut, 
Frank, go get the unguentine. 



Bob Clark, for carrying on after he found out that his secret 
sorrow was a Mrs. Too bad she didn't see you in your boots be- 
fore she took the fatal step, isn't it? Since that sight is absolutely 
irresistible, her name would now be Clark instead of — well. 



Bob Ansley, for not becoming a butcher. He's expert at cut- 
ing people's throats and putting knives in their backs. Wouldn't 
it be funny if somebody skinned him and dried the hide just 
like any other Snake's? Such a little big man. 



PAGE 159 



The Entre Nous 



HALL OF INFAMY 

Paul Kincaid, for maintaining such a high opinion of his own 
superiority throughout four years in college, in spite of a number 
of discouraging incidents. That's the old spirit, Paul! 



Tom Everetts and Jim Stuart for having nerve enough to 
offer the Beta Phi Alphas one of their own chairs in exchange 
for the sofa. Oh, yeah, and they stayed clean in spite of the 
fact that they lost a whole load of toilet accessories in Macon, 
Georgia, last fall. 

i i i 

Lawrence Fitzpatrick, for being such a good example to the 
football team last year. It's said that he readily adapts himself 
to all conditions. 

i i i 

Ed Mason, for maintaining that expression of sweet innocence 
even when he's unconscious. Really, Ed, you should wake up 
sometime and let us all see what you look like when you're 
thinking. 

i i i 

Miss Frence Haynes, for her occasional lapses into her delight- 
ful native mountaineer style English. Yes, even the Dean slips 
once in a while. 

i i i 

And, lastly, me, my dear, dear public, for telling everything 
I know in this manner. Nastly old baby, anyhow! 



PAGE 160 



V 



1 



The Entre Nous 



IN APPRECIATION 

D 

*l We, the 1933 Entre Nous 

Staff, gratefully acknowledge 
the help of our Advertisers 

'/ in making this issue of our 

Annual possible. 



PATRONIZE 
OUR ADVERTISERS 



HOWARD COLLEGE 

OWNED AND CONTROLLED BY 

THE BAPTISTS OF ALABAMA 



Howard College is a standard A-Grade college of arts and 
sciences. It is a member of the Southern Association and is on 
the approved list of the Association of American Universities and 
the American Association of University Women. Its academic 
credits are accepted fully by the universities and professional 
schools of this and other countries. 

Howard College is alive with the hardy vigor of ninety-one 
years of increasing usefulness and prestige. It is a friendly school. 
It offers advantages, educational, cultural, recreational, such as 
only a large city affords. 

Two recent graduates of Howard College are now in Oxford 
University, holders of Rhodes Scholarships won in competitive 
selections in successive years, 1930, 1931. 



For Catalogue and Other Information 
ADDRESS 

PRESIDENT T. V. NEAL 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



COLLEGE ANNUALS 

CATALOGUES 

BULLETINS 

Birmingham 
Printing Company 

Largest Publication 
Plant in Alabama 



Office and Plant 

Fifth Floor, Phoenix Bldg. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



L. G. BALFOUR 

COMPANY 
Official 

FRATERNITY 

Jewelers 



Branch Office 

2104 FIFTH AVE., NO. 

Birmingham, Ala. 



Compliments of the 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Birmingham 



BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



Van Dyke Studios — 

Wish to Express Appreciation of the 
Opportunity to Serve As 

OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER 

FOR THE 

1933 ENTRE NOUS 



ffl 



VAN DYKE STUDIOS 

22iy 2 North Nineteenth Street 
Birmingham, Alabama 



Atlanta-Southern 
Dental College 

ATLANTA, GEORGIA 

Four-Year Course, Leading to 
the D.D.S. Degree 



Modern Buildings and Equipment 

Ample Clinical Facilities 

Dental Clinics Open the Entire 

Calendar Year 

Entrance Requirements One Year of 
College Work 

Session Opens October First 



For Catalogue and Information JVrite 

RALPH R. BYRNES 

D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 

Dean 



Invest the Interest, Collect the 
Principal! 

And a Wealth of Mental Satisfaction Through Life Insurance 

JEFFERSON STANDARD LIFE 
INSURANCE CO. 

ALBERT LEE SMITH 

General Agent 



212^4 N. Twenty- first St. 



Birmingham 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

Hill Grocery 
Company 



-^c?° 



BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



SLACK'S FLOWER 
SHOP 

Incorporated 

2006 Third Ave., N., Watts BIdg. 
BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Phone 3-6119 



The Home of Beautiful 
Flowers 




Back of All Gulfsteel Products Stands the South's Largest Independent 
Manufacturer of Finished Steel 

GULF STATES STEEL COMPANY 

Brown-Marx Building 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



Ingots 

Billets 

Slabs 

Wire Rods 

Bars 

Plates 

Angles 

Sheets 

Welding Rods 



Bright Wire 
Annealed Wire 
Galvanized Wire 
Barbed Wire 
Manufacturers' Wire 

Wire and Rods 

Straightened and Cut 



Woven Wire Fence 
Nails 

Galvanized Nails 
Cement Coated Nails 
Staples 
Bale Ties 
Fence Posts 



Compliments of 

BRILLIANT COAL 
COMPANY 

1812-17 Webb Crawford Building 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



Producers of 

Genuine BRILLIANT 
Coal 

(Trade Mark Reg. U. S. Patent Office) 

The South's Finest Fuel 

LUMP, EGG, NUT, STOKER- 

A SIZE FOR 

EVERY DOMESTIC USE 



Compliments 

INDEPENDENT 
PRODUCE CO. 

DEALERS IN 

ALL KINDS OF FRUIT 

PRODUCE, POULTRY 

AND EGGS 



2101 Morris Avenue 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



FOOD As Well As DRINK 



BOTTLED CARBONATED BEVERAGES 

Manufactured by 

BUFFALO ROCK COMPANY 

NEHI BOTTLING COMPANY 

COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY 

ORANGE CRUSH BOTTLING COMPANY 

DR. PEPPER BOTTLING COMPANY 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



A FRIEND 



STORES 




Birmingham, Alabama 



ITS REAL 



made with real cream, cane 
sugar, and the finest of fruits, 
nuts, chocolate and other flav- 
orings. No "manufactured 
cream," adulterants, or sub- 
stitutes are ever used in 

Southern Dairies Ice Cream 



DIXIE CLUB 
Coffee and Tea 





Meanie 




Coy 


Young 


Thing: 


"I hate to 


think 


of my 


twenty- 


fifth birth- 


day?" 








The 


Brute: 


"Why, 


what hap- 


pened ? 


' — Dirge. 





PANSY HAM 



YOU CAN ALMOST SEE THE FLAVOR 

Through flavor and freshness they have won 

first place on Alabama tables. The finest hams 

you ever served! Savory! Tender! 

Good for you! 

ALABAMA PACKING CO. 



ROLLER CHAMPION 



"THE FLOUR THE BEST COOKS USE" 



JOE WATKINS 
BOB WOLFORD 

ODUM CLOTHING 
COMPANY 

2023 THIRD AVENUE, NORTH 



"I've been in a terrible state of 
consternation for the last three 
days." 

"Did you ever try eating 
prunes?" — Lord Jeff. 



CAHEENS 



FOR STYLE AND 
QUALITY! 



A Place to Save — 
Always 

HAVERTY 
FURNITURE CO. 

2108 FIRST AVE., N. 



rr Good Clothes" 

BLACH'S 



Best Wishes 

LOVEMAN, JOSEPH 
& LOEB 



MILK FOR HEALTH 


AT SCHOOL, AT HOME, LET US SUPPLY YOU 


R. G. 


GRIFFITH DAIRY 




TARRANT, ALABAMA 



YEILDING 


BROTHERS 


CO. 


THE OLDEST DEPARTMENT STORE IN 
BIRMINGHAM 


2131 


Second Ave., No. 





DONOVONS 

RED DIAMOND COFFEE 



Flowers For All Occasions 
MONTGOMERY'S, Inc. 

Phone 3-2135 
2006 North Fifth Ave. Birmingham 



FOR YOUR HEALTH 

McKessons Health Helps 
At Your Druggist 



Compliments of 

Martin Biscuit Co. 



Compliments of 

IMPERIAL LAUNDRY 



JEFFERSON BRICK 
SUPPLY COMPANY 



1701 First Ave., So. 



Birmingham 



L G. BALFOUR CO. 

HOWARD'S OFFICIAL 
JEWELERS 

ATTLEBORO, MASS. 



DO YOU KNOW? 



*\, 



That Howard's enrollment has not fallen 
off even in these bad years. 

That the Senior Class for years now has 
been larger than the entire student body in 
1900. 

That Howard has outstanding Missionaries 
in China, South Africa, Palestine, Japan, and 
other foreign fields. 

That an alumnus is in the diplomatic serv- 
ice in Paris, France. 

That a Howard Alumnus is now President 
of Howard. 

That a Howard Alumnus is Head of the 
Department of Spanish in Ohio State Uni- 
versity. 

That a Howard graduate is former Federal 
District Attorney in New York City. 

That a former Chief Justice of the Su- 
preme Court of Alabama was a Howard 
graduate. 

That a Howard graduate and former Pro- 
fessor is a Professor in the University of 
North Carolina. 

That five Howard Professors are au;hors 
of text-books, and that nearly all the Pro- 
fessors have published scholary article*-. 

That a Howard professor is one of the 
greatest authorities in a certain field of 
Spanish. 

That Howard has a trained Specialist as 
Director of Physical Education for women. 

That Howard has probably the best de- 
partments of chemistry, biology and physics 
in the South. 

That a Howard Professor is organist in 

the largest Baptist Church in Birmingham, 

and is a musician of international celebrity 
as a composer. 

That the Dean of the College of Pharmacy, 
University of Tennessee, is a Howard grad- 
uate and that he is the author of widely used 
text-books. 

That Dr. William Thomas, Professor of 
Greek and Latin, was the Fourth of July 
orator in Athens, Greece, a couple of sum- 
mers ago. 

That Howard is a leader in the technical 
academic teaching of Religious Education. 

That two Howard graduates were chosen 
in consecutive years for Rhodes Scholarships. 

That Howard graduates have taught and 
are teaching in some thirty leading colleges 
and universities of this country, including 
Harvard, North Carolina, Virginia, Alabama, 
Louisiana, Texas and Cincinnati. 




THIS BOOK PRINTED BV 





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world's 

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OF 

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fflcg/ie^^uaiih/JfVoA/imanmtp^ ^jud&ik&l (Qxien&riUi -JwuUce; 




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that reflect those happy, 



carefree days has been our 
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± A A A 



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* I N THE HEART OF THE 



S O XJTM 



« 



«? 



M